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Digital Journal Reports

article imagePhoto Essay: Moths in Montana for National Moth Week Special

Coram - Related to the butterfly, there are apparently some 200,000 species of moths worldwide, but scientists believe there could be many more. These moth images were captured in Flathead County Montana, over a period of two weeks.
It began with one image and then became an obsession. Strange how that happened after their dive bombing antics and continuous bouncing off the porch lights bordered on the annoying.
But it took just one image for the evolution to begin. Virtually overnight, moths transitioned from irksome to fascinating. And the incessant need to grab the camera each morning to see who stopped by is only a tad disconcerting.
The following images are of moths from all shapes and sizes. The species of each moth is currently being evaluated. Some are bland but beautiful in their simplicity, others are incredibly stunning.
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This moth s markings resemble the face of a cat.
This moth's markings resemble the face of a cat.
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This moth would be practically invisible on the trunk of a tree.
This moth would be practically invisible on the trunk of a tree.
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Sharped-edged wings define this moth. His brilliant colors are hidden here.
Sharped-edged wings define this moth. His brilliant colors are hidden here.
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According to Bug Guide.net, "the related word "motte" in German shows that "moth" was inherited from the ancestral language that gave rise to both German and English. The Old English form" Bug Guide explains was "moþþe."
Once he opens his wings  he presents with peacock eyes.
Once he opens his wings, he presents with peacock eyes.
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Project Insect.com says that "once a cocoon is spun, the caterpillar turns into a mushy soup during metamorphosis."
And powder-coated wings? Contrary to popular belief the website said, moth's wings are not covered with powder, but with "thousands of tiny scales and hairs.
Moths navigate using the stars and are attracted to light through a process called 'phototaxis', an organism's automatic movement toward or away from light. Moths are positively phototactic said How Stuff Works.com.
Almost translucent  the end of this moth s wings resemble frayed drapes.
Almost translucent, the end of this moth's wings resemble frayed drapes.
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The moth shown in the primary images (top left) spreads his wings.
The moth shown in the primary images (top left) spreads his wings.
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On March 13 2009, Butterflies and Moths.org added 59 new Montana records of butterflies and moths to its database. With National Moth Week coming up between July 23-29, what better way to celebrate than sharing some of Montana's finest specimens?
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