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article imageOttawa: A brief historical account and photographic perspective Special

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By Igor I. Solar
Jun 25, 2012 in Travel
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Once winter is over in one of the world’s coldest capitals, Ottawa prepares to celebrate Canada Day and to receive visitors from all over the world who marvel at the natural beauty of the area and the splendid displays of military pageantry at The Hill.
Ottawa is one of the most beautiful and easiest cities to visit, particularly during the summer. The Canadian capital sits at the confluence of three rivers - the Ottawa River, the Gatineau River and the Rideau River. Thus, wherever one turns there is always plenty of water, and most residents and visitors must cross a bridge at one time or another.
Despite the formality of public/government buildings and the severity of federal politics, the city is green, clean and fun. The National Capital Region boasts a large number of attractions, monuments, museums, scenic parks, and also fantastic food venues, including street-food at lively markets, fine restaurants, groovy pubs and places where one can enjoy those famous BeaverTail pastries.
The Centre Block of Parliament Buildings. The original building was destroyed by a fire in 1916 and ...
The Centre Block of Parliament Buildings. The original building was destroyed by a fire in 1916 and rebuilt in 1920. The building in the Gothic Revival style is home to the House of Commons, the Senate and the Library of Parliament, located in the rear of the building.
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Parliament Buildings and The Fairmont Chateau Laurier Hotel (right) separated by the locks of the Ri...
Parliament Buildings and The Fairmont Chateau Laurier Hotel (right) separated by the locks of the Rideau Canal. In the left bottom corner is the Government Conference Centre.
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Elgin Street begins at Wellington Street  next to the Parliament buildings and the bridge over the R...
Elgin Street begins at Wellington Street next to the Parliament buildings and the bridge over the Rideau Canal. In the centre of Confederation Square is Canada's National War Memorial (center right).
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Downtown Ottawa skyline seen from the Ottawa River.
Downtown Ottawa skyline seen from the Ottawa River.
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Ottawa was not always as neat and respectable as it is today. Around the 1600s, at the time French explorer Étienne Brûlé adopted the ways of the Algonquin and Huron Indians and travelled up the St. Lawrence River towards the Great Lakes, the Ottawa region was nothing but a vast wilderness. Life was harsh and dominated by tough pioneers and fur traders who fought each other and made the Indians sick with smallpox.
The Locks connecting the Rideau Canal and the Ottawa River. In the background is the Alexandra Bridg...
The Locks connecting the Rideau Canal and the Ottawa River. In the background is the Alexandra Bridge spanning the Ottawa River between Ottawa and Gatineau, Quebec.
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Busy George Street in the Byward Market neighbourhood looking towards the intersection with Sussex D...
Busy George Street in the Byward Market neighbourhood looking towards the intersection with Sussex Dr.
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The old brick building of  The Grand  Italian Restaurant at George and William St  in the Byward Mar...
The old brick building of "The Grand" Italian Restaurant at George and William St, in the Byward Market section of Downtown Ottawa.(No advertisement intended).
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The first settlement by the Ottawa River was established in 1826 by Lieutenant-Colonel John By, a British military engineer assigned to the area to supervise the construction of a canal system connecting a series of natural waterways between Kingston and the Ottawa River. Lt.-Col. By wisely decided that building a town to house the workers was a priority. The settlement grew to provide lodgings and services to thousands of soldiers, engineers and labourers working on the canal. To honour the founder, the town was given the name of Bytown.
Outdoor seating at the  Aulde Dubliner & Pour House  Pubs located at William at Rideau in the By...
Outdoor seating at the "Aulde Dubliner & Pour House" Pubs located at William at Rideau in the Byward Market area. The Irish pub has a mezzanine patio with hand-crafted cast iron railings and flower boxes.(No advertisement intended).
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Elgin Street at Sparks St. in downtown Ottawa. In 1966  Sparks Street was converted into a pedestria...
Elgin Street at Sparks St. in downtown Ottawa. In 1966, Sparks Street was converted into a pedestrian mall making it the first such street in North America.
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The Central Post Office building located on Sparks Street was completed in 1939. It currently houses...
The Central Post Office building located on Sparks Street was completed in 1939. It currently houses the offices for the Privy Council of Canada.
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The National War Memorial located on Confederation Square has several bronze sculptures commemoratin...
The National War Memorial located on Confederation Square has several bronze sculptures commemorating the First and Second World Wars and the Korean War. In 2000, the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier was added to symbolize the sacrifice of all Canadian soldiers who have died for their country. In the background is the Fairmont Chateau Laurier Hotel.
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It took about six years to build the canal at a cost over four times higher than initially estimated. About a thousand workers died of accidents, malaria and other diseases. Because of its historical significance, in 1925 Rideau Canal was included in the list of National Historic Sites of Canada. In 2007, the Rideau Canal and associated structures, including fortifications, watercourses, dams, bridges and locks, became a UNESCO World Heritage Site as "the best preserved example of North American canal building", having many of its original structures in place and operating.
The Rideau Canal consists of a series of lakes and rivers connected by canals. It stretches from Kin...
The Rideau Canal consists of a series of lakes and rivers connected by canals. It stretches from Kingston to the Ottawa River. The Ottawa section is about 6 kilometres long and is lined by pathways, beautiful homes and gardens.
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The Ottawa section of the Rideau Canal stretches for about 6 kilometres and it is lined by pathways ...
The Ottawa section of the Rideau Canal stretches for about 6 kilometres and it is lined by pathways, beautiful homes and gardens.
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The Ottawa River and Parliament Hill. For most of its length  the Ottawa River marks the border betw...
The Ottawa River and Parliament Hill. For most of its length, the Ottawa River marks the border between Ontario and Quebec.
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By 1832, work in the canal had been completed, but most of the 1000 settlers opted to remain in the area to work on the growing lumber industry mostly destined for British and American markets. Large sawmills processing red and white pine operated in the Gatineau (Hull) area, across the Ottawa River. On January 1, 1855, when the community had about 6000 residents, Bytown was incorporated as a city, and the name of the town was changed to “Ottawa”.
Just two years later, in 1857, Queen Victoria had the privilege a naming Canada’s capital city by deciding among 5 options: the choices included four previous capitals, Toronto, Kingston, Montreal and Quebec City, and also Ottawa. She chose the latter for several reasons: because the budding city was in a strategically defensible setting; at a good distance from the American border and in a favourable location for economic growth and potential westward expansion of Canada; its population already had a multicultural mix of English, French and Irish peoples; and, very decisively, because the new Capital city could bring the territories of Upper Canada (present-day Southern Ontario) and Lower Canada (parts of modern-day Quebec and the Labrador region) into the United Province of Canada.
The entrance to Sparks St. from Elgin St. has inviting flower lined street-side cafes.
The entrance to Sparks St. from Elgin St. has inviting flower lined street-side cafes.
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Large planters with colourful flower arrangements clearly show that summer has arrived to downtown O...
Large planters with colourful flower arrangements clearly show that summer has arrived to downtown Ottawa.
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The new capital city needed appropriate infrastructure to conduct the political businesses. Thus, in 1859, the land until then known as Barrack Hill, where the lodgings of Lt.-Col. John By’s troops stood during the construction of the Rideau Canal, was allocated for the erection of the Parliament Buildings. The construction of Parliament Hill run into several technical and budgetary problems, and it was suspended in 1763. The government of the United Province of Canada did not get to use the new facilities since on July 1, 1867, the Province of Canada along with New Brunswick and Nova Scotia established a new confederation under the name of Dominion of Canada. The buildings on Parliament Hill were completed in 1876.
The Changing of the Guard ceremony is held each morning at 10 AM  late June to late August  in front...
The Changing of the Guard ceremony is held each morning at 10 AM, late June to late August, in front of the Centre Block of Parliament Hill in Ottawa.
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Red-coated Governor General s Ceremonial Foot Guards train very hard so they can completely ignore p...
Red-coated Governor General's Ceremonial Foot Guards train very hard so they can completely ignore photographers. No one can make them smile!
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Parliament buildings.  View of the Library of Parliament seen from the Ottawa River. The Library was...
Parliament buildings. View of the Library of Parliament seen from the Ottawa River. The Library was built between 1859 and 1876.
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Much history has taken place since then, including fires, strikes, riots, the Great Depression, two World Wars, smallpox and influenza epidemics, the Universities of Ottawa and Carleton were established, and so on. But, perhaps one of the most significant events for Canada and Ottawa, from the patriotic perspective, took place on February 15, 1965, when the new Canadian flag, the red and white Maple Leaf was raised for the first time atop the 92-metre-tall Peace Tower in the Centre Block at Parliament Hill.
The Byward Market is Canada s oldest continuously operating farmers  market.  Beautiful hanging bask...
The Byward Market is Canada's oldest continuously operating farmers' market. Beautiful hanging baskets in full bloom are sold during the spring and summer months.
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The Byward Market in Ottawa is Canada s oldest continuously operating farmers  market.
The Byward Market in Ottawa is Canada's oldest continuously operating farmers' market.
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Ottawa is an exciting and dynamic place for close to 1.2 million residents. In 2010, Mercer placed Ottawa second (after Vancouver) among large cities in the Americas for quality of life and in 14th place in the world. In 2012, MoneySense weighed and ranked 190 Canadian cities and towns in 22 categories; Ottawa was named the best city to live in Canada for the third consecutive year.
Understandably, Ottawa is also a delightful place to visit for about 8 million tourists spending over $2.2 billion each year in the Nation’s Capital. The city has a lot of history and is an outstanding example of Canadian culture and traditions. Among the major attractions in the city are the Rideau Canal and Locks, the historic, supposedly haunted, Fairmont Château Laurier Hotel, the Canadian Museum of Civilization, the National Gallery of Canada, the Canadian War Museum, the Byward Market and of course, the Parliament Buildings including the magnificent Changing of the Guard Ceremony performed by the Governor General's Foot Guards and the Canadian Grenadier Guards with their regimental band, drums and pipers, wearing their distinct red coats and black bearskin tall hats.
The glass and granite Great Hall of the National Gallery on Sussex Drive  seen from the Ottawa River...
The glass and granite Great Hall of the National Gallery on Sussex Drive, seen from the Ottawa River.
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View of the Museum of Civilization from the Ottawa River.
View of the Museum of Civilization from the Ottawa River.
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Houses and Totem Poles in the Grand Hall at the Canadian Museum of Civilization.
Houses and Totem Poles in the Grand Hall at the Canadian Museum of Civilization.
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Ottawa’s history is relatively recent. Since its beginning in 1826 as a rough frontier outpost by the Ottawa River, Bytown became a multicultural community, the nation’s capital and a beautiful city. Within a week, in July 1, Ottawa will be the focus of Canada Day celebrations, commemorating the passing of the Constitution Act, 1867, and the establishment of Canadian Confederation.
Bill Reid’s “The Spirit of Haida Gwaii” represents the Aboriginal heritage of the Haida Gwaii ...
Bill Reid’s “The Spirit of Haida Gwaii” represents the Aboriginal heritage of the Haida Gwaii region (Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia). The sculpture (the White Canoe) in the Grand Hall of the Museum of Civilization in Ottawa, is the plaster model used to cast two bronze sculptures. One of them (the Black Canoe), is at the Canadian Embassy in Washington, DC; the second one (the Jade Canoe), sits at Vancouver International Airport.
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article:327324:34::0
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