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article imageAssange 'The World Tomorrow' Ep 8: Cypherpunks part 2 — Privacy

By Anne Sewell     Jun 12, 2012 in Internet
London - In part 2 of Assange's interview with the Cypherpunk movement, we learn how Internet privacy is in danger and what steps can be taken to protect this.
As stated in last week's episode, cyber threats, hacker attacks and laws are officially aiming to tackle Internet piracy, but are, in fact, infringing on people's rights to online privacy.
Cypherpunks is a movement originating from Cypherpunks’ Electronic Mailing List, which was set up by activists aiming to improve Internet privacy and security through proactive use of cryptography. The movement has been active since the late 1980s. WikiLeaks is one of the many projects derived from Cypherpunks.
Jacob Appelbaum and Andy Müller-Maguhn - Cypherpunks
Jacob Appelbaum and Andy Müller-Maguhn - Cypherpunks
Video screen capture
The Cypherpunks movement is all about keeping your private data private. “The math problem” created by cryptographic decoding is one of the few locks on the web box government agencies have yet to break.
Julian Assange plays as "devil's advocate" throughout this episode, bringing forth a lively discussion between the group.
In this episode, copyright and "stealing" of music on the Internet is discussed along with Internet privacy, freedom of speech and freedom of economic interaction.
Guests on today's continuation of episode 8 are:
Andy Müller-Maguhn, a member of the German hacker association Chaos Computer Club.
Jacob Appelbaum, a US independent computer security researcher and activist currently involved in the Tor project designing an online anonymity system and who represented WikiLeaks at the Hope Conference in 2010.
 The World Tomorrow  Episode 8 - Jérémie Zimmerman - La Quadrature du Net
"The World Tomorrow" Episode 8 - Jérémie Zimmerman - La Quadrature du Net
Video screen capture
Jérémie Zimmermann, a co-founder of the Paris-based group La Quadrature du Net, which advocates the free circulation of knowledge in the Internet.
As part of this episode, Jérémie Zimmermann makes a striking speech about Internet censorship and loss of Internet privacy:
"When you talk about Internet censorship, it is about centralizing the power to determine what people may be able to access or not. And whether its government censorship, or also private-owned censorship, they are changing the architecture of the Internet from one universal network to an organization of small sub-networks."
"But what we are discussing since the beginning are all global issues, whether we are talking of the financial system going awry, whether we are talking of corruption, whether we are talking of jail politics or energy, or environment, or I don't know."
"All of these are global problems that mankind is facing today and we have one, still one, global tool between our hands that enables better communication, better sharing of knowledge, better participation in political and democratic process."
"What I feel, what I suspect, is that a global, universal Internet is the only tool we still have between our hands to address those global issues."
"And this is why it is an essential fight, that we have to fight and that we all have a responsibility here to fight."
Jacob Appelbaum of the TOR Project.
Jacob Appelbaum of the TOR Project.
Video screen capture
On the subject of encouraging youngsters of today to work and stand up for their Internet privacy and freedom, Jacob Appelbaum closes the episode with the following statement:
"The key thing that people should walk away with, especially if there is some 16-year-old or 18-year-old person that wishes they could make the world a better place, the thing they have to know is, that you can build alternatives. And everyone, especially with the Internet, is empowered to do that for the context that they exist inside it."
"It is not that they have a duty to do it, but it is that if they wish to do this, they can. And if they do that, they will impact many people, especially with regard to the Internet."
"That's why I am here, because if I don't support you [Julian Assange] now in the things that you are going through, what kind of a world am I building? What kind of message do I send when I let a bunch of pigs push me around. No way, never!"
"We have to build and we have to change that. As Gandhi said, right, you have to be the change you want to see in the world. But, you know, you have to be the trouble you want to see in the world too."
The full episode can be viewed above.
"The World Tomorrow" is broadcast live every Tuesday on RT at 11:30 GMT and published on Digital Journal as soon as the video is available.
Previous episodes are as follows:
Episode 1: Julian Assange 'The World Tomorrow' Episode 1 — Hassan Nasrallah
Episode 2: Assange — 'The World Tomorrow' — Ep. 2: Zizek & Horowitz (Video)
Episode 3: 'The World Tomorrow' — Ep 3: Assange & Tunisian president (video)
Episode 4: 'The World Tomorrow' — Ep 4. Rajab & El-Fattah: Arab Spring (video)
Episode 5: Assange 'The World Tomorrow' — Ep. 5: Surviving Guantanamo Bay
Episode 6: Assange 'The World Tomorrow' — Ep. 6: Ecuador fights its media
Episode 7: Julian Assange 'The World Tomorrow' — Ep. 7: Occupy movement
Episode 8: Assange 'The World Tomorrow' — Ep 8: Cypherpunks Part 1
More about Julian Assange, the world tomorrow, cypherpunks, Internet privacy, Internet censorship