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article imageOp-Ed: Child vaccinated for Polio ‘stops walking’

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By Ernest Dempsey     May 21, 2012 in Health
Islamabad - Another ‘suspected’ case of polio reported in a Pakistani child who was vaccinated for polio. Perhaps it’s time to raise a very important question.
There was hardly any more appropriate way than to quote verbatim, in the title above, what the latest media report published about a Pakistani child who was vaccinated and still developed what sounds like paralysis. Now what do we call this policy of Pakistani media– subtlety of expression, or reluctance to highlight threats?
As readers may spot in the report, a child from Islamabad was vaccinated for polio, and he never missed a dose as the vaccination program requires. But he has developed a disability which is suspected to be polio. While we should praise this particular paper for at least reporting the case, the reporting has been stripped of all the suspicion that gives a reader a critical glimpse of the situation. We don’t miss noting that the report excludes all details of what actually happened to the child. He is said to have ‘stopped walking’. Sounds like the word ‘paralysis’ is too scary for the masses most of whom still do not know about the life-threatening and life-crippling effects of the orally administered polio vaccine – one that was banned in the US more than 10 years ago, and banned in Europe more than 25 years ago.
The tests of the child have been sent to the NIH lab, which, as the news report notes, is the only one across the entire country that can medially verify a polio case. A single lab in the entire country of 180 million people for testing a polio case! Does that not sound like a joke? Well, perhaps it is. No wonder that polio cases are ‘on decline’ as some claim in this country. But are they?
Let’s look at some of the news links where Pakistan’s truth-shy media dared to report on cases of paralysis or even death among children vaccinated for polio:
• December 2010: Incidence of polio among children vaccinated under the polio eradication program rises and causes concern for the government.
• June 2011: An infant hardly 2 weeks young died in Naseerabad (Punjab) soon after polio vaccine was administered to her. The parents blamed the vaccine for the death. But, as expected, the local administration declared it as natural death.
• November 2011: A 5-year-old child in Faisalabad (Punjab) died after becoming paralyzed neck-down just a few days after polio drops were sent down her throat. The child started complaining of pain in her limbs immediately after receiving the drops, soon starting to scream out of pain. The bereaved parents protest and blame the polio vaccine for the child’s death; their cries are ignored.
• Of 4 reported polio cases, three children in Pakistan’s Sindh and Punjab provinces were those vaccinated for the disease – Source: Measles Initiative
• February 2012: Two kids in Sindh crippled for life; the children’s father blames the polio vaccine for the calamity and demands for a probe; as usual, the curtains drop over the cases.
A number of other links are there online about disparate cases of polio and DEATH occurring immediately or soon after the administration of the polio drops. In some cases, media create the excuse of ‘expired vaccines’ causing the damage; sometimes it is ‘improper’ or ‘careless’ administration of the drops; and sometimes just ‘suspected’ cases of polio happening after the vaccination. But no one dares ask the question: why a vaccine version that is banned in the developed world given to millions of children in the third world?
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
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