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article imageRon Paul attacks CISPA — urgent call to oppose 'Big Brother' bill

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By Anne Sewell     Apr 24, 2012 in Internet
Congressman Ron Paul has now spoken out against the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA). He urges U.S. citizens to inform themselves about this 'Big Brother' bill.
On April 4, 2012 Digital Journal reported on CISPA, a new bill being considered in Congress.
This draconian bill would allow the U.S. government to spy on internet users' communications, social media posts and navigation through the internet, all in the name of "cybersecurity".
Congressman Ron Paul has now publicly spoken against the "Big Brother" bill and the audio is posted above.
The Republican representative from Texas is asking the U.S. public to educate themselves on what would be a major threat to individual privacy throughout the U.S.
One portion of his speech includes: "Imagine having government-approved employees embedded at Facebook, complete with federal security clearances, serving as conduits for secret information about their American customers."
This would be a fact under CISPA, which is being considered by Congress this week, with the possibility of it being pushed all the way to the White House for President Barack Obama's approval.
CISPA is being touted as a necessary tool to crack down on cyber terrorism threats. However Paul warns that behind this lies something much worse.
“CISPA is essentially an Internet monitoring bill that permits both the federal government and private companies to view your private online communications with no judicial oversight, provided, of course, that they do so in the name of cyber security,” he explains.
Paul talks about the huge online and street protest against SOPA and PIPA, which led to the demise of those draconian bills.
He explains that the CISPA bill is very broad and would allow government to view the personal correspondence of anyone in the U.S.
He explains that: “The bill is very broadly written and allows the Department of Homeland Security to obtain large swabs of personal information contained in your email or other online communications. It also allows email and other private information found online to be used for purposes far beyond any reasonable definition of fighting cyber terrorism.”
Paul insists that while SOPA and PIPA have been stopped, the government is determined to censor free speech on the internet.
“We should never underestimate the federal government’s insatiable desire to control the Internet,” he says.
“CISPA represents an alarming form of corporatism as it further intertwines governments with companies like Google and Facebook. It permits them to hand over your private communications to government officials without a warrant, circumventing the well-known established federal laws like the Wiretap Act and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act."
“It also grants them broad immunity from lawsuits for doing so, leaving you for without recourse for invasion of privacy,” he adds.
Opponents are already attacking CISPA and those in Congress responsible for the bill and various petitions exist online. However, the backlash is much fewer in numbers than the protests earlier this year against SOPA and PIPA, where Facebook, Google, Wikipedia and other major internet companies had joined the protest.
This time, as reported by Digital Journal companies Facebook, Google and Microsoft are actually in support of and can profit from this bill.
Paul calls CISPA "Big Brother writ large" and that it cuts into “the resources of the private industry to work for the nefarious purpose of spying on the American people.”
He concludes: “We can only hope the American people will respond to CISPA as they did with SOPA back in January.”
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