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Harmony between the Music and Technology Industries?

By Digital Journal Staff     Mar 16, 2001 in Lifestyle
LONDON - The music industry has come a long way since the days of chamber music. The gramophone record was the first great advancement in music distribution.
ddmi Europe 2001, Europe's premier digital music forum will be
addressing concerns faced by the music industry in the wake of the dramatic changes brought on by the digital revolution. The industry is faced with tremendous upheaval, never before have so many opportunities been open to companies in and outside of the traditional music paradigm.
However, not until the last decade has there been any real leap in music
distribution. Music no longer requires a physical entity to exist.
Granted, a physical interface is required to convert the digital code
into a listenable form, but the music itself need not be transported
physically - the emergence of the internet has revolutionised the
mechanics of the music industry.
This opens up many opportunities, but also presents many pitfalls.
Always a thorn in the side of the record companies and various artists,
piracy allows (albeit illegally) crude duplication of musical content.
The advent of the compressed digital music file (MP3) removes the
barrier of sound quality impairment, and the ever-increasing popularity
of file sharing systems have allowed this form of duplication to
proliferate.
So how is technology assisting the music business, if at all? Companies
such as Vitaminic, TakeOutMusic, peoplesound.com are making a success of
distributing music across the web. Intertrust, Netsertion and DMOD
(Digital Media On Demand) are developing technologies to enhance the
secure delivery of these files across the net. Meanwhile new generation
file sharing is really taking off with companies such as openCola
developing software architecture that allows the search and acquisition
of online content.
The leaders of music and its new related industries will be addressing
central issues at the ddmi Europe 2001 industry forum in London during 2-3 April. Issues of streaming technology, copyright law, and monetisation will be addressed by senior representatives from companies such as edel music, WapBeats, BBC Worldwide, and Groovy Gecko, the event's official Streaming Media sponsor.
www.ddmiglobal.com
More about Music, Mp3, Napster, Recording