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article imageWomen voters boost Obama over Romney, says new ABC poll

By JohnThomas Didymus     Apr 11, 2012 in Politics
A new ABC News/Washington Post poll released on Tuesday shows that women voters contribute significantly to Obama's present lead over Mitt Romney. The polls showed Obama is leading Romney 57 to 38 percent among registered female voters surveyed.
According to ABC News, the poll conducted on Tuesday is the second major poll in recent weeks indicating a gender gap.
The Langer Research Associates, which produced the poll for ABC News/Washington Post, said Obama's 57 to 38 percent lead among registered female voters is his biggest margin among women to date.
ABC News reports Romney led Obama among men 52 to 44 percent, but the lead was offset by the president's overwhelming female support. When both genders were aggregated Obama led Romney 51 to 44 percent.
The participants were asked to rate both candidates on a number of issues. Obama did best on participants' assessment of his ability to handle issues related to women. He led Romney by 19 points. ABC News notes that women alone did not account for Obama's lead over Romney on women's issues. He also had a 10-point lead among men surveyed on their assessment of Obama's ability to handle "women's issues." Among women surveyed, however, Obama led by a wider margin of 27 points.
According to ABC News, the poll's margin of error was +/- 4 percentage points.
Obama also scored a 56 percent approval rating among women surveyed and 43 percent rating among men.This, according to Langer Range Associates, is a "record" for Obama.
National Journal reports a USA Today/Gallup Poll released on April 2 also showed that Obama is leading Romney 51 to 42 percent among registered voters in swing states, with a lead of 54 to 36 percent among women, a clear 18 percentage points lead.
According to Reuters, the poll of 933 registered voters taken March 20-25 in the "battleground states" of Colorado, Florida, Iowa, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia and Wisconsin, showed women under 50 have swung over to Obama with more than 50 percent now supporting him compared with less than half of the same group in February. Support for Romney in the same group dropped by 14 points to 30 percent. National Journal reports Sara Taylor Fagen, Republican strategist and former political adviser to George W. Bush, said: "The focus on contraception has not been a good one for us...and Republicans have unfairly taken on water on this issue."
According to ABC News, the ABC/Post poll also showed a positive shift among female voters in terms of Obama's approval and voter preference. Obama received a 50 percent approval rating among women in a previous March 10 poll, up from 40 percent in October. White women, in particular, have, since March, shifted in favor of Obama. According to Langer Research: "White women then favored Romney over Obama by 55-38 percent; today they divide evenly, 47-48 percent."
Reuters notes that the results are a clear indication to Republicans of the problems they could face with women as a critical bloc in the general election, with female support for Obama surging significantly since February. The Washington Post also observes that one of the biggest challenges Romney campaign will face in the November election is how to overcome Obama's strategic edge among women.
Reuters reports the Republican party has not fared well among American women voters who are more likely to register as Democrats. This was attributed to Republican position on birth control. The present trend has been attributed to Romney's statement that he will end Planned Parenthood which provides reproductive health care services for women.
The USA Today/Gallup poll showed 41 percent of women identify as Democrats and 24 percent Republicans.
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