Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.

article imageBlogger claims to have found major flaw in TSA screening process

article:320803:18::0
By Tucker Cummings     Mar 7, 2012 in Travel
A major flaw in the TSA's screening process has been unmasked by a blogger. As shown in the video below, a person could get a metal object through the TSA body scanners by placing the item to the side of the body, rather than the front or back.
The host of this video is blogger Jonathan Corbett, who runs the site TSA Out of Our Pants! According to Mashable, Corbett was one of the first people to sue the TSA over the implementation of the full body scanners. Corbett argues that they violate Fourth Amendment rights, as they could be classified as an unwarranted search or seizure.
This is not the first time the full body scanners used by the TSA have come under fire. The units are in use at 39 airports in the US, and do deliver small amounts of radiation when in use. The amount of radiation has been deemed safe, but critics are pushing for further studies.
The New American reported on a recent study of the TSA late last year, which argued that despite the agency's $60 billion budget, the screening program is based on mere "theatrics."
Vanity Fair also came to a similar conclusion, with their own Charles C. Mann able to create a fake boarding pass that got him through security. He concluded that "all those [TSA] security measures accomplish nothing, at enormous cost."
The TSA replied to the video, writing on its blog: "...it is a crude attempt to allegedly show how to circumvent TSA screening procedures...[it[ is not a machine that has all the tools we need in one handy device. We’ve never claimed it’s the end all be all."
article:320803:18::0
More about Tsa, Blogger, Airport security, Transportation Security Administration, Airport
More news from
Latest News
Top News
Engage

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers