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article imageArtist makes her San Francisco debut with 3D psychology 'Id' Special

By Jonathan Farrell     Feb 20, 2012 in Arts
San Francisco - Full pallet to the metal might be a way to describe artist Carmit Haller's designs as they made their San Francisco debut on February 16 for an evening reception at the Bluxome Street office of McGuire Real Estate.
Dozens of friends, associates and guests who attended were impressed with the vibrant colors and abstract forms that filled the entire room; turning an office space into a full-scale art exhibit. "All pieces in this exhibit are taken from psychology," said Haller. One of her favorites is the one entitled "Id." Haller calls her technique "Metal Werks." She enjoys working with designs primarily on aluminum because metals, like aluminum has more shimmer and sophistication to it, than canvas or wood. And, when a piece like "Id" is displayed with its three dimensional aspects, the viewer is pulled more dramatically to the work, noted Haller.
Haller has had showings in Los Angeles, New York, Israel, and the Caribbean. This being her debut, "I am eager to have more showings here in San Francisco," she said. An Academy of Art University alumni, she mentioned that before pursuing a career in art, she earned a Bachelors of Arts degree in social work and psychology in Israel. This current exhibit is inspired by established terms and concepts in the field of psychology. The abstract designs stem from the subconscious. Haller admitted that even with the spontaneity of abstract forms, "yes there were some pieces," that getting the essence of the concept-design just right "was frustrating." She pointed to the "Id" piece on the wall and said, "the color within the wheel shape was intense."
Bold, vivid or stark color is that raw, honest element that grabs people and pulls them toward the art. This is what appeals to Haller. "Some pieces emerged quickly and others took months," she said. "The 'Id' piece for example, recalling Sigmund Freud's theory, represents the impulse side of the human being," she said.
"The three dimensional aspect adds an edge to her work, said long-time friend John Nelson. "I love it!" "And, loved it right from the start," he said. With use of bold, stark and sharp colors and shapes - those in attendance were attracted in one way or another to their particular favorites in the collection. "It's amazing," said Linda Ye of New Tang Dynasty Television. "I usually don't think of subject-matter like psychology-theory in this way," she said as she pointed to "Nekyia" an abstract design in muted hues of blue, gray and black. Named after the analytical theory established by Carl Jung, Ye said "theory like that is cold, yet here it is as art, impressive," Ye said.
Haller was pleased that so many at the reception that evening were intrigued by her work. While her works like "Inner-insight" and "Id" were her favorites, she confessed that to select a single favorite piece above all is like "choosing between babies." Her involvement with each piece is full and dedicated. "Sometimes I have to go through a lot of experiments and details to arrive at the point where I know when it is time to step back and realize there is no need for improvement, this is it," said Haller.
Haller finds her work in art very fulfilling. She is happy to be doing what she enjoys. It seems that all of the previous achievements like in psychology and then in graphic design, prepared her for this point in her life. "I got into graphic design unexpectedly as I was interested in designing an educational software program for teaching psychology concepts," said Haller. Once she got into the computer skills and various aspects she was hooked. She realized that computer art design appealed to her. Once rooted in graphic arts, a new path opened and Haller was on her way. Her work has received acclaim, (like "Best in Show") going back over 10 years when she entered the Fine Arts /New Media degree program at the Academy of Art University. Obtaining her fine arts degree along the journey she established a successful career as skillful and respected senior graphics designer. . "With my own creations there are no deadlines or client demands," she said. Yet, Haller has done commissioned pieces that have been displayed in public spaces, lobbies, hotels and such like upscale design retail stores of Roche Bobois and in private homes.
Haller confided that before she stepped into the field of graphic design and then fine art, her focus in life up to that point had been vocational. She really had no idea that her work in psychology near Tel Aviv would bring her to a totally new life in the San Francisco Bay Area. "I have known Carmit for eight years," said friend Terence Ty. "I have seen her progress, moving along into the more specialized metal work." Ty walked over to the large circular piece entitled "Albedo." Also, named after another one of Jung's concepts that implies a sort of alchemy of the human spirit purging itself, a stage where insight into the shadows of the ego are realized. He pointed to the layers upon layers of colors in the piece saying, "metal work like this is pearly like the lining of an abalone shell. This has delicate subtlety and depth. When this reporter mentioned that all the works in the exhibit were inspired by established psychology concepts, he said, certainly, her background in psychology." "Yet I think the inspiration for her work also comes not only from her previous career but a lot from traveling," said Ty.
Haller and her husband are world travelers, now stationed in the San Francisco Bay Area. "Carmit always has ideas when she travels," said Ty. Impressed with the work and its basis in the subject of psychology, he insisted, "travel I think is the catalyst of inspiration for her, I am curious to see what she produces next," said Ty.
The exhibition of Carmit Haller's work will continue to be on display from February 16 to April 20, 2012 at McGuire Real Estate - 17 Bluxome Street, San Francisco. For more information about Haller and her "Metal Werks" creations visit her web site.
More about Carmit Haller, Art exhibit, San Francisco, McGuire Real Estate
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