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article imageHoliday weekend draws nature lovers to Maine's Marginal Way Special

By Tucker Cummings     Feb 19, 2012 in Lifestyle
Ogunquit - They call the state of Maine "America's Vacationland." And even in the off season, the beaches of coastal Ogunquit draw visitors from all over the world.
Thanks to an unseasonably warm and snowless winter, Ogunquit's famed Marginal Way walking path was a natural place for people to congregate and bask in the glory of nature over President's Day Weekend. Voices with accents from Massachusetts, Quebec, and even England resounded on the paved pathway. Families brought their dogs for a walk, or brought along children and let them play on the rocky coastline.
From the Marginal Way, walkers could see crowds wandering along the sands of the beach, and even a lone paddleboarder fighting against the receding tide.
A lone paddleboarder takes on the Atlantic in February.
A lone paddleboarder takes on the Atlantic in February.
While this winter has been remarkably mild, there were still a few isolated patches of snow to be found along the path.
A small patch of snow stubbornly refuses to melt in the February sun.
A small patch of snow stubbornly refuses to melt in the February sun.
A patch of snow on the rocky coast of Ogunquit.
A patch of snow on the rocky coast of Ogunquit.
Halfway down the trail, a monument stands that honors those who have helped to build and maintain the Marginal Way over the years. Not far from there, bushes that are normally verdant in the summer are now bare and covered with red berries.
Frostbitten berries on the Maine coast.
Frostbitten berries on the Maine coast.
And after their walk, many people walk towards restaurants like The Oarweed and Jackie's Too for a warming cup of clam chowder, fond memories of the beauty of the Maine coast augmented by dining at tables that look out over the ocean.
The Marginal Way leads to a series of seafood restaurants at one end.
The Marginal Way leads to a series of seafood restaurants at one end.
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