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1 comment   Listen   Print   article:319776:18::0
In the Media

article imageCrest mouthwash killing people's tastebuds

Several brands of mouthwash are being touted as killers of taste buds after many cases where people lost their ability to taste after using the alcohol-rich product. In one case a woman's taste buds were affected so bad she could not even eat.
Mouthwash has long been utilized to kill germs in one's mouth and freshen breath, but there seems to be quite the devastating negative consequence to using it too. In a letter written to the Consumerist, a woman points out how her mother suffered the loss of her sense of taste after using Crest's Pro-Health mouthwash.
"My mother fell 'victim' to Crest mouthwash about a week ago when, after swishing it a bit, she lost senstaion in her tastebuds. It was immediate," wrote the reader named Maria. "Now, whenever she eats, she has a sickening metallic taste in her mouth. My poor mom has practically stopped eating beacuse it makes her so sick .I'm devastated, my once vital mom now looks sickly everyday."
She goes on to express her frustration with the Food and Drug Administration for both approving and allowing such products on the market after reading of several thousand cases just like her mother's.
"I am not satisfied with simply boycotting Crest, they must be held accountable."
A similar situation was brought up on Yahoo Answers regarding the use of Listerine antiseptic mouth wash. A user complained about going five days without having any sensation in her taste buds.
While seeming to be temporary in some cases, Maria felt her mother got the short end of the stick and the article suggested seeing a doctor if there is no feeling in the tastebuds after a week.
One of the key ingredients in mouthwash is alcohol, which kills bacteria in the mouth says the Mouth Doctor. Halitosis, the bacteria that causes bad breath, thrives when there are small amounts of oxygen. Naturally-produced saliva fights off this odor-causing menace to some extent, and while alcohol may kill it for the time, in the long run using it is counterproductive.
Alcohol leads to dehydration, which means less oxygen in the mouth. The ultimate result is not only risking paralyzing your ability to taste food, and possibly not eating at all, mouthwash will more than likely make your bad breath situation worse instead of better.
In a final sarcastic statement by the Consumerist, it was mentioned that Crest should re-package and market its popular brand of mouthwash to assist in weight loss instead.
article:319776:18::0
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