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article imageFather shoots daughter's laptop over Facebook dispute

By Holly Goodwin     Feb 10, 2012 in Internet
Yesterday an enraged father posted a YouTube video reading a rant on his daughter’s Facebook wall about him, and then he addressed each point, and later "executed" her laptop.
His Facebook page, with a link to the video, quotes, “Parents and Kids... watch. Today was probably the most disappointing day of my life as a father and I don't know how to correct the situation. Since I can't seem to make any headway with my daughter on Facebook, I chose instead to remedy the problem permanently.”
Yesterday on February the 8th an enraged father posted a YouTube video. The video entails him reading a rant on his daughter’s Facebook wall about him, him addressing each point, and then of him executing her laptop.
The father, Tommy Jordan, begins by sitting down and explaining the situation. He says that his daughter has been grounded several times for posting crude words and other bad material on her Facebook page. Naturally, his daughter, Hannah, used privacy settings to block her parents and church groups from being able to read her angry rants against her parents. As Jordan reads the letter viewers can listen to his daughter’s complaints. A few of the complaints were having to sweep every day, having a stressful school life, being too tired to do anything past ten, being forced to work for her father, and cleaning the cabinets every day. He countered most the complaints by saying how he had it a lot harder as a kid, but specifically got angry when a part of her rant called one of his friends a “cleaning lady.”
If Hannah had used privacy settings to keep her parents from reading these rants readers may be wondering how he found out. His daughter made a grave mistake by thinking she could keep someone in the IT career outside her private information, but the biggest mistake was overlooking the traitorous family pet.
Jordan says he originally found out about the posts due to a Facebook page they had set up for their dog as a joke. Hannah forgot to ban the dog from being able to view her status, and when Jordan logged onto the dog’s account to post a new picture he saw the rant.
In response, and after countering all her complaints, he took her newly updated laptop and put somewhere between six to eight bullets straight through it.
Since then his video has been shared over 3,000 times over Facebook and the comment section is a battleground about parenting tactics.
His Facebook profile says that he refuses to speak to the media about the issue, but assures everyone that his daughter is doing OK after the destruction of the laptop.
One of his updates humorously states: Truthfully though the social attention has helped her and I both deal with it. We had our discussion about it after she returned home from school. We set the ground rules for her punishment, and then I let her read some of the comments on Facebook with me at my computer. At first it was upsetting. Then as we read it became less so, eventually funny to both of us. At the end, she was amazed that other people had such amazingly strong reactions. Some said she’d grow up to be a stripper. Others that she’d get pregnant and become drug addicted because of the emotional damage. She actually asked me to go on Facebook and ask if there was anything else the victim of a laptop-homicide could do besides stripping because all the posts seem to mention that particular job and she wasn’t so keen on that one.
Then he laments his Facebook page will never be the same again.
What can kids take from this message? To keep their personal information secure without overlooking anything which sadly is almost a must in this digital age, but what can parents learn from it?
More about Father, Daughter, Laptop, Facebook, Tommy Jordan
 

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