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article imageIceland's Loch Ness monster?

By Amanda Payne     Feb 8, 2012 in Odd News
Amateur footage has been published on the Internet purporting to show Iceland's equivalent to Scotland's Loch Ness Monster. The legendary monster is known as Lagarfljótsormurinn.
Stories about the monster date back to at least 1345, according to a report in the Iceland Review. The legend tells of a tiny worm that lived in Lagarfljót lake. A young girl put the worm on a gold ring to make it grow. When she came back, she found the worm had grown much bigger but that the ring was still the same size. She threw the ring and the worm into the lake, where the creature continued to grow and grow.
So much for the legend. The video, posted by Hjörtur Kjerúlf, appears to show the path of the monster as it wriggles through the icy lake. Sceptics say that it is actually a fishing net that was caught in the ice and then as the ice melted slightly, the net began moving creating the illusion.
According to the Daily Mail, there have been many reported sightings of the worm which is said to be at least 91 metres long with humps, very similar to sightings of the famous Loch Ness beastie. Some people over the years have claimed to have seen it out of the water , moving around the trees or coiled up like a snake.
The monster even has its own Facebook page which says that the lake in which it lives is "a freshwater below-sea-level, glacial-fed body of water in Egilsstaðir. The water visibility is incredibly poor as a result of situation, and the creature--if it does exist--has not been scientifically studied."
There seems to be some confusion about whether the sighting of the worm is a sign of good news or bad but the video is very likely to increase tourism to the area so can only be good news in that respect.
More about Iceland, Loch ness monster, Lagarfljótsormurinn, Egilsstaðir
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