Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.

article imageArtworks at Crystal Bridges Museum here today, gone tomorrow Special

article:318577:47::0
By Kay Mathews     Jan 27, 2012 in Arts
Bentonville - Almost 100 pieces of light-sensitive artwork will soon be placed in the museum's vault and the "Wonder World" special exhibition will close shortly. Now is the time to visit Crystal Bridges and see this artwork while you can.
KNWA reports that "If you are planning a trip to Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art in Bentonville, you may want to hurry up and get there" (video included).
Elizabeth Weinman, the museum's registrar, was quoted as saying "close to 100 of the pieces currently on display are considered light sensitive, and must be stored in darkness to preserve them for the future."
In addition to silk prints, watercolors and other light-sensitive pieces that will be placed in the museum's vault in February, the special exhibition titled "Wonder World: Nature and Perception in Contemporary American Art" will conclude on May 5.
Wonder World consists of thirty-three contemporary pieces by established, mid-career, and emerging artists organized around the themes of nature, history, perception, representation, and illusion.
Light-Sensitive Artwork
Among the pieces noted in the KNWA video that are soon destined for the museum's vault are works by John La Farge and Edward Sheriff Curtis.
La Farge (1835-1910) is a foremost American painter who worked in oil, in watercolor, on glass, and on wood. A watercolor painting titled "Peonies in the Breeze" (1890, watercolor and gouache on paper) in one of La Farge's works that will soon be taken down.
John LaFarge s  Peonies in a Breeze.   Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  Bentonville  AR
John LaFarge's "Peonies in a Breeze." Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Bentonville, AR
image:105352:8::0
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art has an extensive collection of works by Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952). According to the Edward S. Curtis Gallery, Curtis spent "30 years photographing and documenting over eighty tribes west of the Mississippi, from the Mexican border to northern Alaska. His project won support from such prominent and powerful figures as President Theodore Roosevelt and J. Pierpont Morgan."
Below is a photograph of four photogravure works by Curtis that are currently on display at Crystal Bridges, but are likely to be rotated out in February. They are (left to right, top to bottom) "Two Whistles-Apsaroke" (1908), "Assiniboin Camp" (1908), "Sioux Chiefs" (1905), and "In a Piegan Lodge (1910) with a close-up of "Sioux Chiefs."
Works by Edward Sheriff Curtis.  Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  Bentonville  AR
Works by Edward Sheriff Curtis. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Bentonville, AR
image:105350:7::0
Works by Edward Sheriff Curtis.  Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  Bentonville  AR
Works by Edward Sheriff Curtis. Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Bentonville, AR
image:105351:8::0
Wonder World
The Wonder World special exhibition opened on the day that Crystal Bridges opened 11-11-11 and will conclude on May 5. One of the pieces in that exhibition, according to Weinman, that is also light sensitive is "Devorah Sperber's "After the Last Supper," which is made out of 20,736 spools of thread."
"A spool of thread would fade if you left it in the sun at home," Weinman told KNWA. "This could as well so it's the same sort of process. It will be out for only a limited amount of time."
Devorah Sperber s  After the Last Supper.   Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  Bentonville  AR
Devorah Sperber's "After the Last Supper." Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Bentonville, AR
image:105354:6::0
Devorah Sperber s  After the Last Supper.  Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Bentonville  AR
Devorah Sperber's "After the Last Supper." Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Bentonville, AR
image:105366:7::0
Another eye-catching work in the Wonder World collection is Walton Ford's "The Island" (2009, watercolor, gouache, pencil, and ink on paper). The Arkansas Times reported that the 8-feet-high by 11 ½-feet-long triptych "is considered to be Ford’s largest and most ambitious work to date."
Walton Ford s  The Island.   Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art.  Bentonville  AR
Walton Ford's "The Island." Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Bentonville, AR
image:105355:7::0
If you are not in a position to hurry up and get to Bentonville, Arkansas, Weinman told KNWA that "there are plenty of other pieces in the collection waiting to see the light of day...It's almost a guarantee that every time you come to the museum, there will be something new to see."
When museum guides were asked what visitors might expect to see as replacements, they said that rumors are circulating about exhibitions consisting of artwork by Norman Rockwell and pieces from France's Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre).
article:318577:47::0
More about Crystal bridges, special exhibition, Art, crystal bridges museum of american art, Arkansas
More news from
Latest News
Top News

Corporate

Help & Support

News Links

copyright © 2014 digitaljournal.com   |   powered by dell servers