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article imageThe Brent Group Adds its Support to the British Freedom Party

By Richard Milnes     Jan 25, 2012 in Politics
The British Freedom Party (BFP) and the Brent Group have taken steps to join forces.
Paul Weston, Chairman of the British Freedom Party, has welcomed Brent Group members to the Party and the Brent Group Chairman has encouraged members to join the BFP.
Roger Bennett, Chairman of the Brent Group, urges members to join the BFP
In an e-mail sent to members of the Brent Group on 24th January, Roger Bennett, gave his support to the BFP and recommended members to join this party.
The possibility of setting up a new or parallel party structure with Andrew Brons MEP at the helm had been considered, but in the end it was decided that it would be pointless to set up yet another nationalist political party, so the Brent Group is now backing the British Freedom Party.
Roger Bennett pointed to the success of other Freedom Parties in Europe and hoped that this could be mirrored in Britain.
About the Brent Group
The Brent Group comprises current and former members of the British National Party (BNP) and other patriotic individuals sympathetic to the nationalist cause. It has no membership fees and is not a political party, but rather a group of individuals with a common aim.
Roger Bennett, set up the Brent group after a meeting at a carvery in Brent Knoll, Somerset, hence the name. It was set up in order to keep together former officers of the BNP South Somerset branch, but has since expanded as far afield as Northern Ireland and has hundreds of members.
Letter from Paul Weston, BFP Chairman
In a letter addressed to Brent Group members, dated 22nd January 2012, the British Freedom Party Chairman, Paul Weston sets out the Party’s “core objectives” and the work of building “relationships with like-minded people in the UK and abroad.” Recently the English Defence League (EDL) have given their support to the BFP.
The English Defence League expects to capitalise on a Channel 4 Dispatches programme due to be screened next month and this increased support should pass on to the BFP.
The Chairman draws parallels between the BFP and similar parties in Europe which have recently achieved great success.
Paul Weston calls upon members of the Brent Group to join the British Freedom Party and become active and “join us in rebuilding Britain’s future.”
About the BFP
The British Freedom Party was registered just over a year ago on 18th October 2010, according to the Electoral Commission website. The Chairman had previously said on a news interview that it had been started on 10th November.
The BFP describes itself, on its website, as being “cultural nationalists” and “the final bulwark against a political elite that is destined to destroy Great Britain.”
The party Chairman has said that he sees the BFP as being more of a party of the centre and that anybody can join so long as they share a love of Great Britain.
The Right-Wing of British Politics
The right-wing of British politics has become a crowded place, with numerous political parties filling the void created by a Conservative Party that has moved so far to the left and a BNP that has failed to make any progress since the election of Richard Barnbrook, (who has since left the party) to the Greater London Assembly in May 2008 and the election of Nick Griffin and Andrew Brons to the European Parliament in June 2009. Barnbrook and Brons, as well as numerous former active members have now fallen out with the Party Chairman, Nick Griffin. Some have gone on to set up new organisations and political parties.
The United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP), the English Democrats, the British Freedom Party, the National People’s Party, the British National Party and the National Front are currently the main parties on the right of British politics.
Often they find themselves standing against one another at elections, thereby splitting the right-wing vote. Some of the key players on the right are now looking at ways in which they can work together.
Sources and Further Information
The Brent Group website
The British Freedom Party website
The English Defence League website
BNP Ideas website
The Electoral Commission website
More about edl, BFP, BNP, english defence league, british freedom party
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