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article imageTwo dead as localised floods and high winds batter Britain Special

By Kev Hedges     Jan 3, 2012 in Environment
Storms have battered most parts of Britain once again. Scotland experienced gusts up to 100mph and overnight rain and high winds brought down power lines and trees in the south.
On Tuesday morning most of the heavier rains fell during the night. Many thousands of commuters returning to work after the Christmas and New Year holiday season ended, were forced to drive around branches and trees. Many underpasses were flooded causing cyclists and moped riders to negotiate several water hazards. In parts of England, Scotland and Northern Ireland thousands are still without power.
Severe weather warnings remain in place even into Tuesday evening although gusts have dropped to around 45mph as the worst of the low pressure system moves into the North Sea. Ambulance crews in England reported a man died when a tree fell and crushed his van near Tunbridge Wells town centre. Another man died in hospital after being taken by air ambulance from a small tanker which was hit by a 28ft huge wave in the English Channel.
The Port of Dover was even forced to close and roofing on the famous Epsom race course in Surrey was closed after high winds ripped off the corrugated roofing creating a safety hazard. The Met Office reported 106mph gust at Great Dun Fell in the Cumbrian north Pennines, and 102mph in Scotland's capital, Edinburgh. High winds also forced the closure of the QEII Bridge, linking the M25 between Essex and Kent, earlier. It has since reopened.
It's the latest in a round of north Atlantic depressions to hit the British Isles this winter. Motorists in Scotland had to contend with snow and blizzard-like conditions as well as the stormy winds. Travellers can check here for the latest transport advice.
Localised flooding. A spokesman for the Met Office said that an inch of rain fell in the south of En...
Localised flooding. A spokesman for the Met Office said that an inch of rain fell in the south of England in just 24 hours.
West Somerset and Mendip were the worst affected areas in the region  where 23mm of rain fell in six...
West Somerset and Mendip were the worst affected areas in the region, where 23mm of rain fell in six hours.
Flash flooding closed cycleways and left a few inches deep in most underpasses in Hertfordshire.
Flash flooding closed cycleways and left a few inches deep in most underpasses in Hertfordshire.
The Met Office said conditions had been caused by a deep depression
The Met Office said conditions had been caused by a deep depression
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