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In the Media

article imageJournalist quits job, takes Twitter followers, now being sued

By Owen Weldon
Dec 27, 2011 in World
A former journalist is being sued because after he stopped working he kept his Twitter followers that he gathered while he was working for a U.S. mobile news website.
The man, Noah Kravitz, attracted Twitter followers while he Tweeted for the mobile news website Phonedog.
Kravitz tweeted as @Phonedog_Noah, while he was tweeting for Phonedog. However, according to BBC, Kravitz left the company and changed his username too. Kravitz ended up taking the 17,000 followers with him.
Phonedog is now suing Kravitz for damages of $2.50 per month, per user. The total is $370,000.
Kravitz left the company back in October of 2010. Kravits, 38, was told he could keep the Twitter account when he left, according to the New York Times. However, the company wanted Kravitz to still Tweet on their behalf sometimes. Kravitz agreed because he said that they were leaving on good terms., but he changed his name on Twitter.
Kravits was then hit with a lawsuit after 8 months of quitting his job. The company said that the Twitter following was a customer list.
According to the Daily Mail, Kravitz now has around 22,000 followers. His Tweets are diverse too. Some of his Tweets are about flu bugs, liquorice, Steely Dan and even Android phones.
Phonedog considers the followers, fans and brand awareness through social media to be property of the company. This is because of the resources and costs invested into growing them.
Phonedog said that the company will continue to aggressively protect their property.
article:316783:20::0
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