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article imageRomney claims Gingrich too 'zany' to be president

By Nancy Houser     Dec 16, 2011 in Politics
Mitt Romney is a decent and moderate Republican who is not expected to be a champion of the conservatives, at least according to Romney. His word "zany" when describing Newt Gingrich is pure politics.
However, zany refers to something or someone that is "amusingly unconventional," a true description when describing Newt Gingrich. But whether or not that makes him a poor candidate for presidency depends on who is talking. According to the debates and personal interviews, what separates Romney and Gingrich is that one is meticulous, business-like and mild-mannered, the other is anything but.
“Zany is great in a campaign. It’s great on talk radio. It’s great in print, it makes for fun reading,” Mr. Romney told The New York Times. “But in terms of a president, we need a leader, and a leader needs to be someone who can bring Americans together.”
It would be difficult at best or close to impossible to deny that Gingrich has some pretty unconventional ideas: an unheard of education reform; unconventional campaign set-up; his unconventional marriage to Callista; and he uses an unconventional primary strategy for the presidency.
One example that speaks louder than words was where Newt was on November 7, 2011 when Cain was soaking up a possible win of presidency.
According to the Washington Examiner, Gingrich is described as sitting "in a small conference room at the Marriott Hotel here, discussing cognitive illness with three brain scientists."
As unconventional as Gingrich is, his primary concern is "reaching out to everybody who's worried about Alzheimer's -- and over 55 years of age, it is a more common fear than cancer."
"What I am trying to do is initiate the idea that solving health problems is the best way to reduce costs," Gingrich begins. Look at polio, he says. What if it had not been cured? What if one took the high cost of treating polio in 1950 and simply projected it through 2011? The numbers would be enormous. Without even considering the human benefits, curing polio was far, far cheaper than treating it over decades.
With less than two weeks left for the polls in Iowa, Romney definitely has more money than Newt Gingrich. Yet in January, the Washington Examiner reports that Newt Gingrich will be ahead in more states --- nationally and in key early states. But right now Ron Paul's ads are causing Gingrich's position to slip, bringing Ron Paul up the ladder and someone to be reckoned with.
According to Fox narrators, this is one of the most negative primaries they had ever seen, with the candidates are beginning to draw blood on each other. With Gingrich at the top, he is their target. And, according to the latest Digital Journal article on the subject, Gingrich has 25% of the votes, Romney has 17%, and the rest are not sure.
NOTE according to International Business
Total Money Raised
Mitt Romney - $32 million
Ron Paul - $13 million
Newt Gingrich - $3 million
Romney notably fails to attract the so-called “99 percent” and relies heavily on the so-called “1 percent.” Gingrich and Paul are more balanced.
More about Romney, Claims, Gingrich, too zany, President
 

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