Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.

article imageOp-Ed: David Cameron's finest hour

By Alexander Baron     Dec 10, 2011 in Politics
Brussels - The election of UK Prime Minister David Cameron last year showed the triumph of style over substance, now, suddenly, the man whose first priority is always to look good, shows he has a backbone after all.
Peter Mandelson once said tellingly of David Cameron that when they scraped off his veneer they found...more veneer. After all, this was the man who cycled to work to lower his carbon footprint while a limousine followed behind carrying his papers. Suddenly though, as he did during the riots, Call Me Dave has shown that when the chips are down he can make the right decision rather than bow to peer pressure, or considerably greater pressure in his case. Perhaps he remembered that old maxim: One man with truth (or God) is a majority. Perhaps he was afraid of the reaction of his backbenchers if he yielded. Perhaps he stood firm for the wrong reason. The fact remains that he did stand firm, and he did make the right decision.
You can read reports about this monumental event here and here, but let us concentrate here on why what he did was the right thing. In the words of the poet Jay Ramsay: the price of distance is death.
Whether or not one subscribes to the theory that the Bilderberg Group is out to conquer the world, David Icke's lunacy about giant reptiles from outer space, or any conspiratorial explanation at all, the fact remains that the world over, power is being centralised. In the US, this power is being removed to Washington; in Europe, to an unelected self-appointed elite in Brussels, who are basically front men for the banks. The next step, should this ever come about, would be a world supra-government. And who would control that exactly?
Here is some analysis from a financial website as to what Cameron has opted us out of:
Automatic penalties for countries whose government debt is more than three per cent of GDP - in other words, foreigners (ie foreign bankers) want to tell us how we can finance the government, and fine us if we don't comply.
The bailout facility for the eurozone, the European Stability Mechanism (ESM) to be ready to be used by July 2012 - these so-called bailouts have already cost taxpayers throughout Europe hundreds of billions, and there is still no end in sight. Who is to receive this money? Not ordinary working people, not the middle classes, not even the rich, but the banks, trust funds and money changers. And what will they do with it? Play stupid casino games and create even more debt.
A review of the €500 billion bailout fund, whether it is enough or should be increased - this is an academic question, but again, who puts up the money, and who receives it?
Additional funds from EU countries, possibly €200 billion to be advanced to the International Monetary Fund (IMF) to create a fund for EU members in case their debts get out of control. - read when their debts get out of control. And British taxpayers should donate money to the IMF because?
David Cameron may have acted in the interests of Britain, but if other countries follow his lead, the Euro will collapse, and that will ultimately be good news not only for Britain but for cash strapped Greece, for Italy, for France, for Germany, and for everyone, not simply financially but for liberty too. Everyone will benefit, except those who hold the keys to the prison, namely the banksters and the power brokers.
We can only hope that others do follow his lead, and that this will result eventually not simply in the collapse of the Euro but in the collapse of the entire debt-based money system, and the restoration of the creation of credit to sovereign governments, where it rightly belongs.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
More about David Cameron, Europe, European union
More news from