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article imageStudy: Important social change — Important to 80% of respondents

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By KJ Mullins     Dec 6, 2011 in World
The world is changing. "Think globally, act locally" may be a catch phrase but the ideal is one that has become part of the world's mentality, a new study shows.
Citizens around the world agree that what happens elsewhere impacts their local communities according to a Walden University survey.
More than 12,000 adults from Brazil, Canada, China, France, Germany, Great Britain, India, Japan, Mexico, Spain and the U.S. were asked about their perceptions of the importance of social change, the top issues in their country and the future of social change in September as part of The Social Change Impact Report: Global Survey commissioned by Walden University.
Eight out of 10 adults believe that positive social change is important to them personally with adults in Mexico, Brazil, China and India the most likely to say that it is very or somewhat important to be involved. Four out of five adults say they want to be more involved in the future with positive social change.
In a year that positive social change has been big news with events like the Occupy Movement and more awareness of looming global suffering in areas like the Horn of Africa it isn't surprising that social change is on the minds of many. Education though is the most important aspect for many adults for positive social change to address according to the survey.
Globally the greatest importance of social change varied by country with education being key in Brazil, India and the United States. In France, China, Canada and the UK health issues are the most important issues.
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More about Walden University, Survey, Social change
 
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