Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
Log in with Facebook Log in with Twitter
Connect your Digital Journal account with Facebook or Twitter to use this feature.

article imageA visit to Caral-Supe, oldest civilization of ancient Peru Special

By Igor I. Solar     Nov 23, 2011 in Travel
Lima - The Caral-Supe culture of Peru, the oldest civilization in the Americas, developed almost simultaneously with those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and India and about 1500 years before the Mesoamerican civilizations.
The archaeological site of Caral in the Supe River Valley is located about 180 kilometers north of Lima. It developed about 5000 years ago and is considered the oldest city in the Americas. Unlike the cultures of the Middle East and Asia which carried out exchange of knowledge and experience, Caral would have developed in almost complete isolation. Among the greatest expressions of the Caral culture are the construction of giant pyramid-shaped structures and a complex and organized society based on religion, agriculture, commerce and musical activities.
Typical view of the desert while travelling from Lima to the archaeological site of Caral located on...
Typical view of the desert while travelling from Lima to the archaeological site of Caral located on the Supe River Valley.
Picture of an aerial photograph of Peru s Main Pyramid shows the size and complexity of the construc...
Picture of an aerial photograph of Peru's Main Pyramid shows the size and complexity of the construction. The circle, below, center, was probably used for ceremonies and musical concerts.
The City of the Pyramids
Caral was discovered in 1996 by Peruvian archaeologist Ruth Shady. Shady knew of the existence of some sandy hills near the Supe River bank and with a grant from the National Geographic and the help of two archaeologists and three students of archaeology from the University of San Marcos in Lima, began the first excavations in 1994.
View of the circular space in front of the Greater Pyramid at Caral.
View of the circular space in front of the Greater Pyramid at Caral.
Section of the Lesser Pyramid at Caral.
Section of the Lesser Pyramid at Caral.
Subsequent work with government support, including the use of heavy machinery of the Peruvian Army to clear the rubble from the surface of the first hill, led to the discovery of an astonishing stone building nearly the size of four football fields and about 5 stories high. This finding gave credibility to the research and gathered new resources which allowed continuing the work. In total six gigantic pyramids were discovered. Additional 26 architectural structures of various sizes and functions have also been described including several medium and small buildings, temples, residential areas, public plazas, an amphitheater, stores, shrines and streets. It has also been established the existence of places near the city, on the south bank of the river, equipped with canals and irrigation systems presumed having been used for agriculture.
Roads within the archaeological complex allow visitors to walk amid the pyramids and other structure...
Roads within the archaeological complex allow visitors to walk amid the pyramids and other structures. The right side of the road is compacted for wheelchair use.
Ruins of a dwelling located next to one of the large pyramids. It may have been the residence of a r...
Ruins of a dwelling located next to one of the large pyramids. It may have been the residence of a religious leader.
The city of Caral occupies about 65 hectares and it is estimated that it was the home of several thousand people. Current rainfall and river flow conditions are scarce which suggests that there have been significant changes since antiquity. The architectural complex is relatively close to the coast, about 20 kilometers. The sea would have been an excellent source of fish, algae and mollusks to feed the population and to trade with other nearby settlements of the interior and the Andes Mountains. Most likely the Supe River was also rich in fish and crustaceans for consumption by the population.
Further investigations
In 1997 Ruth Shady published her work "The Sacred City of Caral-Supe at the dawn of civilization in Peru" (in Spanish) where she describes and supports the pre-ceramic origin of ancient Caral. The interest derived from her work allowed her to get in touch with researchers at the University of Chicago who worked with her to establish the age of organic objects found in the ruins using the radiocarbon dating technique. Through radiocarbon analysis it was confirmed that the city would have developed starting from around 2700 BC. Some other structures at sites near Caral gave a date of about 3000 years BC.
Remains of netting material found under the stones of one of the pyramids. This type of carbon-beari...
Remains of netting material found under the stones of one of the pyramids. This type of carbon-bearing material was used for radiocarbon dating of the structures built at Caral.
Some of the stone structures at Caral have been interpreted as having served as a market to sell and...
Some of the stone structures at Caral have been interpreted as having served as a market to sell and exchange agricultural products.
Therefore, the culture that developed in Caral had an average age of 5000 years. The discovery showed that the Peruvian civilization that built the great pyramids of Caral began about 1500 years before the Mesoamerican (Maya) civilization and would have been contemporaneous with the cultures of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and India.
Organization and way of life at Caral
According to Shady, Caral was a theocratic city-state which can be considered as the cradle of Andean civilization and one of the oldest foundations of human civilization in the world. Its development took about 600 years and required a high degree of technology and social organization. The Caral pyramids were used by the rulers as centers of religious, political or economic power. Apart from the pyramids, other structures such as plazas, courtyards and shrines represented means of cohesion and religious influence which allowed control of the population and facilitated the production and exchange of goods.
Some sections of the pyramids are extraordinarily well preserved.
Some sections of the pyramids are extraordinarily well preserved.
Besides the six larger pyramids  several other structures of various sizes and functions have been d...
Besides the six larger pyramids, several other structures of various sizes and functions have been discovered at Caral.
The people of Caral were peaceful, gentle people more interested in arts and music than in conflicts and battles. No weapons, elements of war or defense, or human remains have been found in the ruins. Ruth Shady assumes that the people of Caral were a society devoted mainly to production, trade and the enjoyment of life. In one of the pyramids the researchers found 32 flutes made of condor and pelican bones and 37 cornets of deer and llama bones. They also found some evidence suggesting the use of drugs and possibly of aphrodisiac substances. Because of this, it has been assumed that part of the development of Caral was based on the production and distribution of coca leaves.
Connected to the development and economic activity of Caral, and possibly linked to the great sacred city, there were at least other 18 human settlements along the Supe River Valley, which in total could have been inhabited by some 20,000 people. This should have made possible a significant level of trade and commerce with other human populations possibly as far as the Amazon region.
The Sacred City of Caral-Supe was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2009. In its synthesis UNESCO states: “The Sacred City of Caral-Supe reflects the rise of civilisation in the Americas. As a fully developed socio-political state, it is remarkable for its complexity and its impact on developing settlements throughout the Supe Valley and beyond...Caral is the most highly-developed and complex example of settlement within the civilisation’s formative period.”
Visiting Caral is not an easy undertaking. The trip from Lima, the Peruvian capital, takes about three and half hours each way, and part of the road is just a stone-lined gravel path through the desert. Peruvian government agencies (Ministry of Culture, in Spanish) are developing programs to promote domestic and international visits to this important archaeological site. This includes the training of local residents of the Supe Valley capable of serving as tour guides providing information on the significance of the archaeological investigations.
My guide at Caral. Local residents of the Supe Valley work as tour guides providing information on t...
My guide at Caral. Local residents of the Supe Valley work as tour guides providing information on the significance of the archaeological investigations.
More about Caral, Peru, Supe River Valley, Archaeology, ancient civilizations
More news from Show all 6