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article imageA day of Remembrance in Nova Scotia Special

By Lynn Curwin     Nov 11, 2011 in World
Winds were high and rain was heavy but a large crowd turned up to mark Remembrance Day during an indoor ceremony in one Nova Scotia community.
The ceremony usually held at the cenotaph in Truro was moved to the agri-dome on the Nova Scotia Provincial Exhibition grounds in Bible Hill because of the weather, providing those in attendance with much more comfortable surroundings.
One of the war veterans who appreciated the move to an indoor facility was 91-year-old Truro resident Herb Peppard.
"Standing at the cenotaph was hard so it was nice to be able to sit in here," he said. "I didn't think there would be so many here. When I see a crowd like this attending I get choked up."
He said the ceremony means a lot to him, but what he found especially touching this year was a card a child gave him. It was a card saying thank you from the 1st Bible Hill Sparks and Girl Guides, and signed by "Ally W."
Herb Peppard with a card presented to him from the 1st Bible Hill Sparks and Girl Guides.
Herb Peppard with a card presented to him from the 1st Bible Hill Sparks and Girl Guides.
The ceremony brought back memories of men in his unit who lost their lives during World War ll.
"I saw horrible things," he recalled. "The first night I was in combat we were taking a mountain in Italy. I could hear artillery and mortar fire. With every explosion some men were blown down the side of the mountain and I could hear them shout. One man was calling 'Mama!, Mama!, Mama!' That stayed with my all my life."
Peppard, who was a member of the First Special Service Force (a joint Canadian-U.S. force), spent five months in an army hospital in Naples after he was shot in his side, and then went to serve in southern France.
When his unit broke up he joined the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion.
While the wind blew and the rain came down outside  those taking part in the ceremony were able to r...
While the wind blew and the rain came down outside, those taking part in the ceremony were able to remain dry.
The music at the Remembrance ceremony reminded him of the part music played for many soldiers during the war.
"We sang a lot for morale," he explained. "We sang a lot of the songs like 'Keep the Homes Fires Burning'. One buddy of mine from Alberta liked the song 'Jeannie the Queenie of the Burlesque Show' so we used to sing that."
Peppard then paused for a moment and did a very good job of singing the song to me.
He said he kept his emotions hidden away for many years when he was young, but now feels it is good to show emotions.
Cadets stand next to wreaths which will be laid during the ceremony.
Cadets stand next to wreaths which will be laid during the ceremony.
Laying a wreath in remembrance of a family member.
Laying a wreath in remembrance of a family member.
Remembrance ceremony in Bible Hill  Nova Scotia.
Remembrance ceremony in Bible Hill, Nova Scotia.
A cadet accompanies MLA Lenore Zann as she lays a wreath on behalf of the province.
A cadet accompanies MLA Lenore Zann as she lays a wreath on behalf of the province.
RCMP officers lay a wreath.
RCMP officers lay a wreath.
Truro Police lay a wreath.
Truro Police lay a wreath.
A cadet and a war veteran salute after laying a wreath.
A cadet and a war veteran salute after laying a wreath.
During the ceremony.
During the ceremony.
A young cadet salutes.
A young cadet salutes.
Truro Mayor Bill Mills lays a wreath on behalf of the town.
Truro Mayor Bill Mills lays a wreath on behalf of the town.
Hugh Campbell led in the singing of O Canada and God Save the Queen.
Hugh Campbell led in the singing of O Canada and God Save the Queen.
More about Remembrance day, Remembrance, Nova Scotia
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