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article imageChina files official protest on Dalai Lam’s visit to Mongolia

By Nancy Houser     Nov 9, 2011 in Politics
China has filed an official protest against the Dalai Lama’s low-key visit to Mongolia, one day after the exiled spiritual leader arrived in the country that is bordered by China to the south and Russia to the north.
Hoping to deter Chinese concerns over the visit, senior Mongolian lama leaders are saying repeatedly that the visit is purely religious.
"This is a purely religious visit made at the request of Mongolian Buddhist lay-believers and monks," said Choijamts Demberel, head of the Mongolian Buddhist center and head abbot of Ganden Thekchen Choeling monastery. (AP Press Release)
China is best known for accusing the Dalai Lama of wanting to split Tibet from China, a charge by which the notable Nobel Prize laureate fully denies. He firmly states that he only seeks autonomy for his homeland.
"China is always against any country providing a stage for the Dalai Lama's anti-China splittist activities in any form," China's foreign ministry spokesman Hong Lei told reporters. "We have already made our solemn representations with the Mongolian side." (New Age)
Buildings in The Inner Mongolian Capital  Hohhot
Buildings in The Inner Mongolian Capital, Hohhot
MicMacPics1
The visit to Mongolia by the Dalai Lama had originally consisted of a series of lectures, according to the AP news release, with the Mongolian people known to follow the Tibetan school of Buddhism. In the press release, it stated that the Dalai Lama has visited the country approximately half a dozen times.
When he arrived in Mongolia on Monday, November 7, 2011, directly from Japan, the Dalai Lama went to Ulan Bator where he had planned on offering religious teachings and lecturing young students and other individuals.
However, due to excessive pressure from China, who has labeled the spiritual leader a dangerous separatist, Reuters reports that the lecture tour was cut short---restricting the Dalai Lama to only one lecture on Tuesday.
Government efforts had attempted to move the spiritual lecture to a non-controversial location, but Reuters reports that the laureate’s talk was at “the Mongolian capital’s new 4,000-seat Buyant-Ukhaa sports complex.”
However, due to excessive pressure from China, who has labeled the spiritual leader a dangerous separatist, Reuters reports that the lecture tour was cut short---restricting the Dalai Lama to only one lecture on Tuesday.
More about China, Files, official protest, Dalai lama, Visit
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