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article imageAtheist group tries to stop prayers during high school games

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By Kevin Fitzgerald     Oct 27, 2011 in Religion
The Freedom From Religion Foundation is complaining that prayers broadcast via loudspeaker mentioning Jesus during football games should not be allowed to continue at Brooks High School in Alabama. They say that praying imposes religion on students.
According to The Times Daily, a man by the name of Jeremy L. Green filed the complaint with the foundation. They in turn sent two letters to the school district saying that the call for prayers violates the First Amendment and is therefore illegal.
New York Daily News quotes the foundation's attorney, Stephanie Schmitt as saying:
"It is coercive and inappropriate to ask students to listen while a prayer is delivered at athletic events. This is especially disturbing given the young age of these students."
The school district's attorney is currently reviewing the situation and has yet to issue a response.
Fox News notes that school superintendent Bill Valentine claims to have never received such a complaint before.
Many residents in the predominately Christian district are supportive in allowing the prayers to continue at the games.
David McKelvey, a pastor in the community, has said that this issue is very sad, and says that it is an example of the hatred of Christian values in this country.
The Freedom From Religion Foundation states on its website that it has had more than 100 legal successes since 2009.
The organization was able to prompt a school district in Arab, Alabama to cease their pregame prayers. Now they just offer a moment of silence.
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