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article imageToronto Mayor Rob Ford steering clear of Thursday's Ont. election

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By Andrew Moran     Oct 3, 2011 in Politics
Toronto - The Toronto Mayor's office confirmed over the weekend that Rob Ford will not endorse or support any political party or leader ahead of Thursday's provincial election. Ford said he will support anyone who can better assist the city.
Provincial party leaders may actually be relieved Monday morning with the news of not being endorsed by a certain someone.
Although Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has met with all three provincial party leaders – and endorsing Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper during the federal election campaign back in May – he will not support or endorse a political party or candidate on Oct. 6.
The mayor’s office told reporters over the weekend that Ford will support anyone who can help the city, but an official noted that Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak, Liberal Premier Dalton McGuinty or New Democratic Party Leader Andrea Horwath have not promised to subsidize child spaces, according to the Toronto Star.
Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak and his family speaking with a voter.
Ontario Progressive Conservative Leader Tim Hudak and his family speaking with a voter.
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Rob Ford’s press secretary, Adrienne Batra, told the Toronto Sun that the reason the mayor isn’t endorsing anyone wasn’t because polls show his approval rating decreasing. “I think that would be a ridiculous argument for somebody to make.”
Meanwhile, Frank Graves, EKOS Research pollster, told the Globe and Mail in an interview that the prime minister’s talk of a Tory trifecta during a Ford event in the summer – conservatives on the federal, provincial and municipal level – actually hurt Tim Hudak and the PCs in this election.
“Ontario voters have always shown a tendency to hedge their bets between the two senior levels of government,” said Graves in the interview. “Ironically, many of the very things which helped Stephen Harper are lining up in Dalton McGuinty's favour. A loyal and older base who will show up and no real sense that the adventure of change in government is worth the risk right now.”
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaking at event in the Greater Toronto Area.
Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper speaking at event in the Greater Toronto Area.
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The latest CTV News/Globe and Mail/CP24/Nanos Poll survey shows a really tight race between McGuinty and Hudak. The PCs hold a slight edge with 36.4 percent and the Grits are right behind them with 35.9 percent. Andrea Horwath’s New Democrats sit in third with 25.7 percent and Mike Schreiner’s Green Party is in fourth with only 1.2 percent.
Approximately 10 percent are still undecided.
The National Post has endorsed Hudak’s PCs, but the Toronto Sun has not endorsed any political party because Hudak’s Conservative Changebook doesn’t do the job to help the province.
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More about ontario election 2011, Toronto mayor, Rob Ford, City hall, Endorsement
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