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In the Media

article imageJapanese return $78 million in cash found in earthquake rubble

article:310526:56::0
By Kim I. Hartman
Aug 19, 2011 in World
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Tokyo - The people of Japan may have lost their homes, family members, and their livehood to the earthquake and tsusnami but they haven't lost their integrity, according to reports that say over $78 million in cash and valuables has been turned in to authorities.
Its been over five months since Japan was hit by the earthquake and tsunami that left the country devastated and dealing with a nuclear crises on the scale of the Chernobyl disaster. During the trying times reports have continued to spread throughout the news about the honesty and integrity displayed by the Japanese refugees and clean-up workers.
ABC News recently reported that "thousands of wallets, containing over $48 million in cash," have washed up on the shores of Japan's beaches and are being gathered by people who have lost their homes and lives to be turned in to government officials.
Along with the cash filled wallets, police say that rescue and volunteer crews have located more than "5,700 safes containing over $30 million in cash" in the rubble that was left following the national disaster.
Japanese officials told ABC that they are experiencing some difficulty finding the owners of the cash and valuables they are receiving each week. Most have lost their homes and jobs and moved, and some were killed in the natural disaster.
Authorities said they would continue to work tirelessly at returning the cash, gold, stocks, land deeds and valuables found in the safes to their rightful owners.
While looting may be an issue in other countries, including the United States, after natural disasters, in Japan it appears to be just the opposite.
The Blaze said, the Japanese people lack the "'finders keepers' mentality in their moment of crises, unlike London where extensively looting took place after the recent riots."
Ryuji Ito, professor emeritus at Japan's Yokohama City University, told UK's Daily Mail that these selfless acts of honesty and displays of integrity by Japanese people are demonstrative of the mindset and culture of the country. "The fact that a hefty 2.3 billion yen in cash has been returned to its owners shows the high level of ethical awareness in the Japanese people," he said.
article:310526:56::0
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