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In the Media

article imageEvery Little Bit of Exercise is Beneficial

By Oscar Brooks
Aug 16, 2011 in Health
Exercise is important in maintaining good health and possibly extending life. A recent study shows that 15 minutes of daily physical activity can reduce your risk of death by 14%, and increase life expectancy by three years.
The study was reported in an article of Healthfinder.gov and appeared online in The Lancet . It involved more than 400,000 people in Taiwan. They were followed for an average of eight years. The current recommendations call for adults to at least 1.5 hours of physical activity a week.
The study showed people in the low activity group exercising about 15 minutes a day. People in this group were 14 percent less likely to die from any cause. They also had a three-year longer life expectancy than those who hardly did any exercise at all. They were also 10 percent less likely to die from cancer. Dr. Chi-Peng Wen of the National Health Research in Taiwan wrote, "In Taiwan, if inactive individuals engage in low-volume daily exercise, one in six all-cause deaths could be postponed -- mortality reductions of similar magnitude have been estimated for a successful tobacco control program in the general population".
A study like this one hopefully will get people to exercise. So called "couch potatoes" have been encouraged for years to get off their rear ends and exercise. It really starts with the youth. Childhood obesity is a big concern in the United States. Many schools around the country have banned vending machines that sell soda and sugary snacks.
article:310396:6::0
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