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article imageSurvey: Half of men would leave a woman who gained weight

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By Kim I. Hartman     Jul 28, 2011 in Lifestyle
In a recent poll, almost half of the men surveyed said they would dump their partner if she gained weight, 37% said they fantasize about their partner's friends, and 55% think they can tell when a woman fakes an orgasm.
Ask Men and Cosmopolitan partnered to conduct a survey of 100,000 men and women and the results were eye-opening in areas that related to dating, sex, lifestyle and world issues.
When it comes to romance "75% of men claimed they were consistently romantic in their relationships while almost 40% of women report that their boyfriends or husbands are "not very often" or 'never' romantic."
Both sexes agreed that loyalty was the most important characteristic in a partner, but to men a sense of humor came in second. Almost half admitted they were looking for "wife/husband potential" in dating partners but wouldn't end the relationship even if they didn't think he/she was 'the one.'
Twice as many men as women admitted they would cheat on their significant other if they could get away with it, while 67% of women said they had never cheated.
More than half of women said they would want their partner to take birth control if it was available and over two-thirds of men who responded said they would be willing to take a 'male birth control pill' if one was ever developed.
When it came to social networking the men and women in the survey freely shared their opinions on Facebook, friending ex's and meeting someone for a date that they had met online. Women were twice as likely to date someone they had met on the Internet.
Cosmopolitan reports, "38% of women polled are fine with their boyfriend/husband friending an ex on Facebook, but another 27% say it’s okay only if you've met the ex before. And 34% say it's not okay with you for your guy to friend an ex at all." Almost half the men said they weren't concerned if their partner has an ex as an online friend.
Nearly 90% of women admitted they either "occasionally or consistently" check the profile of their significant other on social networking websites.
Males who responded to the Ask Men survey said they weren't as comfortable with texting between opposite sexes, with nearly three-quarters of respondents saying sexting was cheating. Men were also more likely to lie about how many sex partners they had then the women polled by Cosmo.
The men responding to the survey said they would date a woman who made more money then they did, but the majority still felt it was their responsibility to pay when they went out for an evening of fun. When the dating is over and they retreat to the privacy of the bedroom, almost 40% of men in a relationship said they were satisfied with their love life, but more then a third admitted they do fantasize about having a threesome.
When it comes to size, it doesn't seem to matter to women, with less then 20% wishing that their partner was better endowed. 40% of the women said although they were satisfied with the sex in their relationship there was room for improvement. Of the same women surveyed, only 1 in 5 would leave their mate if he gained weight during the relationship.
This is the second survey as of late that asked men and women about weight and how it pertains to a relationship, dating and marriage. A four-year study that was published in the July issue of Social Psychological and Personality Science found that "husbands were more satisfied initially and wives were more satisfied over time when the fairer sex had a lower body mass index -- a common measure of body fat."
The lead author of that study, Andrea Meltzer, said women are under more pressure to achieve and maintain an ideal weight then their male counterparts.
According to Meltzer, "One idea is that attractiveness and weight are more important to men. That might be why we see this emerging at the beginning of the marriage for husbands, and their dissatisfaction might be affecting wives' satisfaction over time," reported ABC News.
The full results of the survey can be found at Ask Men Great Male Survey and Great Female Survey.
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