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article imageNorwegian gunman pleads not guilty to mass killing

By Andrew John     Jul 25, 2011 in Crime
As Norway's alleged mass murderer, Anders Behring Breivik, faces his first court appearance it’s reported by the BBC that there have been calls for a media blackout of his eventual trial in order not to give publicity to his views.
Breivik has been charged with committing acts of terrorism. He has pleaded not guilty, saying he wanted to save Europe and send a strong signal, reports indicate. Breivik has admitted to the shooting, but has not claimed criminal responsibility for the acts.
Judge Kim Heger ruled Breivik would be held for at least eight weeks, and he will be ordered to spend at least four weeks in complete isolation without the right to have visitors or write letters.
A bombing in the Norwegian capital Oslo and a massacre in an island youth camp were responsible for the deaths of 76 people. Previous estimates pegged the number of dead at more than 90, but those numbers have been revised as officials cited difficulties in gathering information at Utoeya island where the shooting took place.
“[Breivik] is said to be linked to far-right groups and to have spent years planning the attacks – the worst since WWII,” says the BBC.
Meanwhile, the UK’s Daily Mail reports that a German tourist hero saved 20 teenagers from being shot. Marcel Gleffe was on his way to the island with his family, and many of the young people at the camp thought at first he was Breivik’s accomplice.
“They were everywhere in the water,” he’s quoted as saying. “I threw lifejackets with a rope attached to them and pulled them aboard. They were all screaming and crying.
“Some of them were shouting: ‘Keep away … Don’t come any closer.’ Others were even asking: ‘Are you going to kill us?’” he said.
“I just did it on instinct. You don’t get scared in a situation like that: you just do what it takes. I know the difference between fireworks and gunfire. I knew what it was about, and that it wasn’t just nonsense.”
A makeshift memorial was created in Oslo  Norway to commemorate those who were killed when a gunman ...
A makeshift memorial was created in Oslo, Norway to commemorate those who were killed when a gunman opened fire on crowds, killing nearly 100 people.
Photo by Jo Christian Oterhals
Timeline
Here is a timeline of the events of last Friday afternoon (times are approximate, because various sources’ estimates differ slightly).
It was at about 3.26 p.m. GMT that at least seven people were killed in the Oslo atrocity, in which a fertilizer bomb exploded, shaking the city centre, blowing out windows in the Prime Minister’s office.
Witnesses subsequently described the scene as being like a war zone
“Sometime thereafter,” CNN reports, “the suspect in the bombing takes a 3/4-mile ferry ride on Tyrifjorden – Norway’s fifth-largest lake – to Utoya island. The 26-acre island, about 20 miles from central Oslo, is hosting a youth camp run by the Labour Party.”
At 3.50 p.m. GMT, shooting was heard from Utoeya. At about that time, says the BBC, “Twitter messages spoke of a gunman dressed as a policeman shooting teenagers at the camp on Utoeya island. Eyewitnesses have since confirmed the gunman was wearing a police uniform.”
Flowers piled up outside a church in Oslo  Norway form a memorial for those who were killed when a g...
Flowers piled up outside a church in Oslo, Norway form a memorial for those who were killed when a gunman opened fire on crowds, killing nearly 100 people.
Photo by Jo Christian Oterhals
Meanwhile, first actual reports of the shootings were said to have been at about 5.26 p.m. GMT and a police SWAT team was dispatched to the island at about 5.40 p.m. GMT.
Eyewitnesses have said that Breivik was wandering around the island – scene of a youth camp – randomly shooting young people there.
Some of the teens jumped into the water in order to escape the gunman’s bullets. “Others,” says the BBC, “hid in undergrowth, cowering in fear.”
When police arrived at the lake at about 6 p.m. GMT – having driven rather than taken a helicopter, because it was quicker – “they had difficulty making the crossing,” says the BBC report, because their boat almost sank.
“When so many people and equipment were put into it, the boat started to take on water, so that the motor stopped,” said Erik Berga, a local police chief. “The boat was way too small and way too poor.”
Flowers piled up outside a church in Oslo  Norway form a memorial for those who were killed when a g...
Flowers piled up outside a church in Oslo, Norway form a memorial for those who were killed when a gunman opened fire on crowds, killing nearly 100 people.
Photo by Jo Christian Oterhals
Automatic weapons
It was 6.25 p.m. GMT when police arrived on the island, and it was then that the gunman gave himself up after what is thought to have been a 90-minute shooting spree.
“Police linked the island massacre to the Oslo bombing,” says the BBC. “They said he had used automatic weapons and handguns, and are investigating whether any unexploded devices remain at the youth camp.”
CNN says authorities are still trying to piece together exactly what happened.
“A manifesto, purportedly written by a man of that name and posted online the day of the attacks, signals his intent to be part of a ‘European civil war’ and his distaste for Norway’s leadership,” says the broadcaster’s online report.
Meanwhile, Euronews reports that Breivik “posted a video on the internet hours before last Friday’s atrocities. In it, among other things, Breivik claims the crusading order of the Knights Templar has reformed as an armed movement for indigenous rights.”
An excerpt taken from a book of Anders Behring Breivik taken from a book downloaded from a link on t...
An excerpt taken from a book of Anders Behring Breivik taken from a book downloaded from a link on the Norwegian discussion website.
Anders Behring Breivik
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