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article imageCorazon De Mexico: Mexican traditions in the heart of Toronto Special

By Andrew Moran     Jul 10, 2011 in World
Toronto - Although the Honda Indy was down the street and Afrofest was drumming away at Queen's Park, Corazon De Mexico welcomed thousands to taste a little bit of Mexico. Spanish guitar, (dead) mariachis and tacos were showcased.
As part of its 2011 Hot Spot Summer season, the Harbourfront Centre is presenting numerous family events throughout the entire summer, including Longo’s Free Flicks, International Market Place, Dancing on the Pier and Canoe Rides on the Natrel Pond.
Also at the Queen’s Quay summer series, there are specialty weekend events that celebrate different cultures from all over the world. From North American cultures to Latin to Middle Eastern, the Hot Spot Summer series is offering heritage-rich festivities.
On Saturday, Corazon De Mexico (Heart of Mexico) was featuring the past and present of Mexican cuisine, music, art and the dead – festival organizers dressed up as deceased police officers, mariachis and dancers.
Following Halloween, Mexico celebrates Day of the Dead, which is a special occasion where families remember the dead and celebrate their lives. Families share stories of their loved ones who have passed on.
During the weekend’s festival, Day of the Dead sculptures were put on display to feature Mexican artists, Linares, who have had inspired such people as David Copperfield and the Rolling Stones.
“The most famous papier-mâché works in Mexico are the work of the renowned Linares family of artists who carry on the tradition of making alebrijes and other figures from cardboard and papier-mâché,” said the festival organizers.
“Each family works in their own workshops in their own houses but will lend each other a hand when big orders come in. Demand rises and falls; sometimes there is no work and sometimes families work 18 hours a day.”
Quique Escamilla performed for the large crowd at the Harbourfront centre stage. Escamilla is a multi-instrumentalist who integrates Latin American music with a variety of genres, including rock, reggae and jazz.
“His music and voice come out of his heart in a dynamic, emotional and passionate form,” writes the festival representatives. “He has come a long way discovering his sound and the purpose of his music.”
Corazon De Mexico concludes Sunday night.
Singer/Musician.
Singer/Musician.
Quique Escamilla
Quique Escamilla
Restaurant vendor.
Restaurant vendor.
Food.
Food.
Day of the Dead sculptures
Day of the Dead sculptures
More about corazon de mexico, mexico festival, toronto festival, Harbourfront centre, mexico culture
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