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article imageOp-Ed: The secret rulers of the world?

By Alexander Baron     Jun 9, 2011 in Politics
For years, decades, watchers of the Bilderberg Group were derided as conspiracy cranks and bigots. Nowadays, this rhetoric is beginning to look increasingly empty.
To be branded a conspiracy theorist is not a compliment; like racist, fascist, anti-Semite, crank, bigot, hater, etc, it is intended to be both a put-down and a conversation stopper. The great irony of this put-down though is that many of the people who denounce others as conspiracy theorists then go on to prove their point by expounding a conspiracy theory of their own: it’s all a fascist plot, or something of that nature. Let us then begin by stating a few facts.
The next Bilderberg meeting is being held June 9-12 at St Moritz, Switzerland, the fifth time it has met in this small, landlocked but influential European nation. The price of oil and the so-called Arab Spring are likely to be two of the items on its busy agenda.
The Bilderberg Group was founded in 1954, and has generally met once a year since then; its attendees have included powerful politicians, heads of state, and even royalty, yet the search term "bilderberg group" yields a mere 5 entries in the Times Index 1785-1985.
The first entry is the obituary of founder member Joseph Retinger, June 13, 1960; the last is a letter from the Deputy Editor of Militant, July 13, 1982. The Militant Tendency was a Marxist-Leninist outfit that worked within the Labour Party, and was a constant pain in the neck to its leadership until its expulsion. Although before the rise of the Internet, leftists were overwhelmingly scornful of so-called right wing conspiracy theories, Militant were part of a small minority who sometimes asked inconvenient questions.
One must ask what is the explanation for this lack of coverage by the Times? First published in 1785 as The Daily Universal Register, the Times is the most prestigious newspaper in Britain, and one held in pre-Internet days on microfilm by research libraries worldwide, yet it appears to have been part of a conspiracy of silence as far as this important group was concerned.
Again, use the word conspiracy, and the demeaning rhetoric and laughter reappear, but the same leftists who use this rhetoric believe the media is controlled by the rich and powerful – the ruling class or “the bosses”. So why do they side with them?
To understand the Bilderberg Group, one must go much further back in history, but one must also be extremely careful both to sort the wheat from the chaff, and not to be led down blind allies. One should for example avoid falling into the trap of giving credence to those who perpetuate anti-Semitic, mystical or just plain loony explanations for which they adduce no evidence whatsoever. The fact that you will inevitably be branded an anti-Semite, crank, lunatic, ad nauseum, doesn’t mean you should become one!
Conspiracies are real, and as old as government if not older; Julius Caesar was the victim of a conspiracy. In 1605, a conspiracy came within a whisker of blowing up the English Parliament. All the participants in this plot, including its most famous member, a certain Mr Fawkes, were Catholics, so no Catholic should take umbrage at the Gunpowder Plot being branded a Catholic Conspiracy. Try using that logic or rhetoric with any conspiracy involving Jews, and see what happens.
That being said, if Jews per se were that powerful and always have been, how can one explain their treatment in Nazi Germany? In any case, the memberships of Bilderberg and similar groups are far from exclusively Jewish; the American contingent is drawn largely from the Eastern liberal establishment, but since 1973, Asian politicians, bankers and other power brokers have played major roles.
Some people trace the origins of the world conspiracy to 929BC; there is obviously no credible written evidence for this, but the evidence that a world plot of sorts began in 1776 is much more credible, for this is when the Order of the Illuminati was founded by Adam Weishaupt, Professor of Canon Law in the University of Ingolstadt, Bavaria. The original goals of this organisation were nowhere near as sinister as they are sometimes made out today; one should bear in mind that any organisation or ideology that is suppressed by the state can exist only as a conspiracy, including at one time Catholocism – as above – and the anti-slavery movement. Coincidentally, in the same year, another Adam – Adam Smith – made a concise and very illuminating point about conspiracy:
“People of the same trade seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.”
This is essentially what lies at the heart of the global power bid. In modern times, the conspiracy against the public and the contrivance to raise prices can be traced to the creation of the Federal Reserve by the Jekyll Island conspirators. This has now been thoroughly documented by a number of authors, including Eustace Mullins in Federal Reserve Conspiracy; Dan Smoot in his groundbreaking The Invisible Government; A.K. Chesterton in The New Unhappy Lords; Gary Allen in the classic None Dare Call It Conspiracy; and W. Cleon Skousen in The Naked Capitalist. All these authors are what might be termed “right wing”, although there are two people not in this category whose works demand considerable attention by serious students of the world conspiracy; Professor Carroll Quigley, and Antony C. Sutton.
Professor Quigley was a liberal academic who was privy to the machinations of this cabal. His book Tragedy & Hope is a must for all serious conspiracy buffs, even though he only mentions the Insiders en passant, and makes it clear he approves of their goals.
Like Professor Quigley, Anthony Sutton was an academic; his Wall Street series and related books on how the West built the Soviet Union, and his studies of The Order are serious attempts to put flesh on the skeleton of the world conspiracy. It should be borne in mind both that Quigley was a liberal, and that Sutton was very much a reluctant conspiracy theorist.
For those who want a quick introduction to the way the Jekyll Island conspirators set about duping the American Government, the American people, and the world, the 1984 speech by the Libertarian academic Murray Rothbard The Origin Of The Federal Reserve cannot be recommended too highly. This is based largely on the researches of the foregoing authors, although Rothbard doesn’t acknowledge them, possibly fearful of being tarred with the same brush, even though he was a Jew. Interestingly though, Rothbard does not claim it was a conspiracy as such but points out that this is how businesses work, they create cartels to obtain and maintain a dominant market position and boost their profits. But, and this is a big but, competition cannot be squelched by simply creating cartels, they need a legal monopoly, and in order to obtain this, they lobby governments to pass laws that will disadvantage or even totally exclude their competitors. Of course, a businessman or industry that simply lobbies the government on its own behalf is likely to be given short shrift, so instead they lobby in the public interest, often through various fronts, including “think tanks” and their academic pimps, what Rothbard alludes to as a modern version of the alliance of throne and altar.
This is one reason that mainstream academics are overwhelmingly hostile to all conspiracy theorists and will either ignore them or go out of their way to smear them.
Returning to the Bilderberg Group, when its existence could be ignored no longer, the line peddled by the media was that it was simply a think tank that met for informal discussions in order to better understand the problems the world faces in the development of new ideologies, technology, shifting alliances, world hunger, and all that sort of garbage. Bilderberg is by no means the first such “think tank”, the Council on Foreign Relations – Dan Smoot’s invisible government – was founded in 1921.
In 1973, the Bilderberg Group was augmented with the Triliateral Commission. When that too came under scrutiny, it peddled the same line, and even published a magazine, Trialog. Now, with the rise of the Internet driven independent media, the secret is well and truly out, so of necessity, the Bilderberg Group has opened its files to some extent, and even has a website.
What is the aim of these groups? They have no single aim, and not everything wealthy men, bankers, politicians, academics and journalists discuss or even plot in secret is necessarily to our detriment. The idea that “the bosses”, the ruling class, etc are uniformly evil is demonstrably false, but the mere fact that world leaders meet in secret at public expense rightly gives cause for concern.
It is clear though that whatever their professed ideals, they have some very shoddy goals. There can be no doubt whatsoever that their ultimate goal is world government, and this is unquestionably the reason nationalism – in particular white ethnic nationalism – has come under such unremitting attack throughout the Western world, particularly by the useful idiots of the “anti-racist” left who see Nazis under every bed.
There are though a couple of flies in the ointment. One is of course the Internet which has opened them up to global scrutiny and analysis by the growing independent media including the far left, some of whom are beginning to realise they have been taken for a ride. The other is a big fish indeed: Islam.
The biggest and most successful coup of the Insiders was the foisting onto the American people of the Federal Reserve, which gave them the ultimate cartel, the control of the money supply of what is now but may not be for much longer the world’s only superpower. Since the dollar replaced sterling as the world’s reserve currency, most Americans have benefitted enormously. So too has the American empire, which runs on cheap oil. The fact that oil is paid for in dollars has in effect allowed the American Government simply to print money – or to create credit – and use this to pay for it. And to maintain troops in Iraq, Afghanistan, and numerous other places. But for how long can this go on?
One of the more intelligent conspiracy theories to account for the sudden unpopularity of Colonel Gaddafi is that he was planning to instigate a gold dinar which would be used by African nations to trade oil and other commodities, with all the implications this would have for the American economy.
Gaddafi aside, there could be more trouble on the horizon both for the increasingly troubled American empire and for the Global Manipulators, as Robert Eringer called them. In the past two years there have been secret meetings between a number of countries, including the emerging colossus, China, who have been plotting – if one may use that word – to replace the dollar with a basket of currencies. And then there is Islam, which calls for a system of banking without interest at all. Should that come about, the power of these semi-secret elites will crumble like a house of cards.
There are some people who believe the Bilderberg Group and its ugly cousins are already all-powerful, and the claims they make are ludicrous. One such grand conspiracy crank is – or was – David Icke. Icke began his career as a soccer player but this was curtailed when he was diagnosed with arthritis, a condition associated with the elderly but which can sometimes strike the young with devastating effects. That may have been a blessing in disguise for Icke because he moved seamlessly into journalism becoming a familiar face on local and then national TV as a sports presenter. However, in 1990 he fell from grace when a principled stand against the poll tax led to his dismissal.
After that, he became involved with so-called New Age groups, originally seeking an alternative to conventional medicine to relieve the pain he still suffered from arthritis. He also became involved with green politics, joining the Green Party and becoming one of their national speakers. Then he discovered the great conspiracy which of course was never mentioned by the mainstream media because of its all-powerful controllers. He also made a series of pronouncements which showed him to be extremely gullible and to make some people question his sanity. One of his less unintelligent acts was to authenticate the notorious Protocols Of Zion, although the claim that the Rothschild family were descended from inter-gallactic lizards was probably not so clever.
Understandably, the Green Party were even more unhappy with this than were the BBC with his stand on the poll tax, and parted company with him. Icke then showed the full extent of his gullibility by claiming in print that the grand conspiracy was planning to impose a world government, a world bank, a world army, and “a microchipped population connected to a global computer.”
He named these conspirators – which included the Bilderberg Group – as the Illuminati, an alternative name for which is the New World Order. In the late 1970s and early 80s, the only people who used the phrase New World Order in print were right wing “cranks” like Gary Allen and those wicked Nazis and anti-Semites. Now, the whole world is talking about the New World Order, and even its proponents use the phrase openly. And increasingly, David Icke is becoming to look less like a lunatic and more like a prophet, especially now that he has dropped most of his mystical nonsense and begun talking about how money is created and controlled, and what we the people must do to take back control from the private cartel of the Federal Reserve and the world banking system.
It may be some time yet before we all have microchips implanted in the backs of our necks, but the growth of CCTV and other tracking devices including for cars and mobile phones is not a bad substitute for total surveillance. The one bright spot is that if they are constantly watching us, we are watching them too. And they don’t like it!
It is also true that the Insiders don’t have it all their own way. Jimmy Carter was all but unknown when he decided to run for President, the former Governor of Georgia, and a fairly minor politician on the national stage. In 1973, he became a founder member of the Trilateral Commission, and four years later he was sitting in the White House, but as Robert Eringer said in Global Manipulators, once he was there he turned his back on David Rockefeller without whose patronage he would not have won the Presidential race, and for the next four years ran the country using his Georgia Mafia.
It remains to be seen if the current President will be quite so independent, although so far he has not disappointed. Both Hillary Clinton and Barrack Obama attended the 2008 meeting of Bilderberg, which was held in Northern Virginia. They both appear to have tried to pass this off as a heads up meeting between the two then contenders for the Democratic nomination, but word leaked out. Does that mean they were both in the pockets of the New World Order? Hardly. For one thing, Obama made a point about financing his campaign from small donors. And immediately after his albeit controversial authorisation of the execution of Osama Bin Laden, he made it clear that he wants a two-state solution to the long running Israel/Palestine saga, and that he wants it sooner rather than later, and with 1967 borders. And, surprise, surprise, the Zionist lobby, which some claim actually controls America, not only acquiesced without a squeak, they actually applauded him.
This indicates that Obama is not quite the marionette he is made out to be in some quarters, although it remains to be seen if he can deliver on the Middle East as easily as he did on Bin Laden. It may also indicate that in view of the Arab Spring, the Western power elites, including the Bilderberg Group, are re-evaluating their assessment of the true value of Israel in a world where oil supplies are dwindling rapidly, and where the Arabs have the bulk of it while the Jews have none.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
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