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In the Media

article imageIran: Siemens in collusion with US and Israel on Stuxnet worm

article:305720:31::0
By Michael Krebs
Apr 17, 2011 in World
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Iranian authorities, frustrated by the effectiveness of the Stuxnet cyber worm in attacking their nuclear facilities, has accused Siemens, the German engineering conglomerate, of helping the US and Israel in orchestrating the cyber attack.
Iran has accused Siemens, the German-based global infrastructure and engineering conglomerate, of helping Israeli and American programmers execute the disruptive Stuxnet cyber worm on Iranian computer systems and electrical equipment.
According to a report in The Guardian on Sunday, senior Iranian military staff contend that Siemens gave American and Israeli computer virus designers access to specific control system specifications, thereby providing a blueprint from which the cyber worm programmers could operate.
Iranian authorities are discussing plans to sue Siemens over the breach that left many advanced Iranian computer equipment disabled.
"Our executive officials should legally follow up the case of Siemens SCADA software which prepared the ground for the Stuxnet worm," Gholamreza Jalali, Iran's civil defense head told the IRNA state news agency, according to The Guardian. "Siemens should explain why and how it provided the enemies with the information about the codes of the SCADA software and prepared the ground for a cyber attack against us."
Siemens has had strong ties with Iran, but the Jerusalem Post reported in January of 2010 that the company ceased operations with Iranian business and government institutions as Western nations increased the pressure on the Iranian regime to end its nuclear program.
Israel, the US and their allies believe Iran seeks nuclear technology to develop weapons. However, Iran insists its nuclear interests are for peaceful civilian purposes.
The Stuxnet worm was as damaging to Iran as it was embarrassing, and the setback caused by the cyber attack is thought to be quite significant, as Iranian engineers at Iran's controversial nuclear facilities were forced to replace key equipment.
US and Israeli officials have not denied involvement in the Stuxnet release.
article:305720:31::0
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