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article imageBodies washing up on Japanese shores as death figures rise

By Michael Krebs     Mar 14, 2011 in World
As the Japanese government issued tepid reports on radiation exposure and overall death figures from the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan, a tide of bodies on Japanese shores underscored concerns of higher casualties.
The enormous tragedy facing the Japanese nation in the aftermath of Friday's earthquake and ensuing tsunami was played out grotesquely on Monday as the Pacific Ocean pushed waves of bodies onto Japanese shores, highlighting the growing concerns that more than 10,000 people have lost their lives.
The Associated Press reported on Monday that tides of bodies appeared along the eastern coast, overwhelming local funeral facilities and crematoriums.
Citing Kyodo, the Japanese news service, AP reported that 2,000 bodies were discovered on two coastal shores in Miyagi alone.
Japanese government officials are revising their death toll estimates upward, confirming beliefs that as many as 10,000 people could have died in Miyagi alone.
According to Newsroom America, Police Chief Takeuchi Naoto told public broadcaster NHK that he had "no doubt" the grim figures north of 10,000 would be confirmed.
Friday's earthquake measured 8.9 and caused extensive damage, moving the Japanese coast eight feet and shifting the earth's access. The earthquake set a 30-foot tsunami in motion, devastating communities along the nation's northeastern coast - and causing a chain reaction among a number of nuclear reactors that have yet to be resolved.
"Some of the greatest needs are food and water, temporary shelter, and World Vision will also be focusing on children and the psychological toll that this earthquake has had by setting up child-friendly spaces for them," Casey Calamusa, a spokesperson for World Vision told All Headline News.
More about japan earthquake, Nuclear reactor, Tsunami, Radiation, Tokyo
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