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article imageCouncil suggests using crematorium to heat pool

By Lynn Curwin     Jan 26, 2011 in Technology
Redditch - A council has proposed that heat generated by a crematorium be used to heat a swimming pool and leisure centre, in an effort to reduce carbon emissions and save money.
Redditch Borough Council, in Worcestershire, said that about £14,000 per year could be saved by using heat from the nearby facility to heat the Abbey Stadium sports centre, but some people are upset about the idea.
"Redditch Borough Council recognises this is a sensitive proposal and is therefore keen to ensure everyone interested fully understands the details," BBC News quoted a council spokesman as saying.
He pointed out that the heat would otherwise be exhausted into the atmosphere.
"I'd much rather use the energy rather than just see it going out of the chimney and heating the sky," council leader Carole Gandy told The Guardian. "It will make absolutely no difference to the people who are using the crematorium for services.
"It's only a proposal at the moment but personally I'm supportive of it because I think it will save the authority money and, in the long-term, save energy which is what we're all being told we should do."
Roger McKenzie, the West Midlands regional secretary for the union Unison, is against the plan to make use of the heat.
"It goes to show yet again that the Conservatives know the price of everything and the value of nothing," Sky News quoted him as saying.
"Unfortunately, local authorities are increasingly pursuing desperate policies in a reaction to the unprecedented spending cuts imposed from Whitehall."
The BBC reported that energy from crematoriums in Scandinavia is being used for heat, and that Oakley Wood Crematorium uses the energy produced by cremation to heat on-site buildings.
Public consultations and debate on the proposals will take place in February.
A video on the story can be found here.
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