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article image'Bridging the continents' at the Toronto Turkish Festival (video) Special

By Andrew Moran     Aug 7, 2010 in World
Toronto - The fourth annual Toronto Turkish Festival took place in downtown Toronto at the Yonge-Dundas Square. The event "celebrates the colours of Turkey" by presenting Turkish cuisine, culture, art, music and dance.
The nation of Turkey has one of the richest histories in the entire world, both politically and religiously. The Trojan Wars took place in the western region of the country. St. Peter’s Church, the first church built by man, is located in Turkey. St. Nicholas – now known as Santa Claus – was born in Turkey. The very first university is in Harran, Turkey.
Toronto’s population of Turkish Canadians is approximately 15,000.
On Saturday, thousands of people visited the Toronto Turkish Festival in the downtown core where attendees had the opportunity to taste the food of Turkey, listen to Turkish music, enjoy the culture of the country and experience the different dances of Turkey.
Performer at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
Performer at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
Performer at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
Performer at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
Dancers at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
Dancers at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
Dance performer at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
Dance performer at the Toronto Turkish Festival.
The two-day, 12-hour event is in its fourth year and is sponsored by the Toronto Star, Turkish Airlines, the city of Toronto, Media 55 Enterprises, Canadaturk and many more.
“This festival is the 4th Turkish festival in Toronto’s history contributing Toronto’s multiculturalism,” states the festival’s website in a press release. “Our first Turkish festival was organized and held by Canadian Turkish Friendship Community on August 5, 2006 with the participation of 40,000 people, and 80,000 people attended in 2007 and 2008. Now we are expecting an attendance of over 100,000 people this year at the event from all over the GTA.”
Mayor David Miller urged Turkish community organizers to extend and expand the Turkish Festival after its success in 2006, which was part of the city’s Live with Culture initiative. Since then, people from different cultures, communities, provinces and nations have visited the festival.
Turkish lady cooking.
Turkish lady cooking.
Turkish lady cooking.
Turkish lady cooking.
Turkish lady cooking.
Turkish lady cooking.
Turkish cuisine.
Turkish cuisine.
Turkish Coffee
Turkish Coffee
Turkish shoe maker
Turkish shoe maker
More about Toronto turkish festival, Turkey, Yonge-dundas square
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