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article imageToronto Tamils commemorate Black July at Queen's Park (video) Special

By Andrew Moran     Jul 26, 2010 in World
Toronto - It has been 27 years since that fateful July week where approximately 3,000 Tamils were killed and hundreds of thousands more were displaced after Singhalese mobs burned down their homes, vandalized their businesses and killed Tamils in the streets.
Tamils have been politically active in Toronto and other parts of the world since the 25-year civil war came to an end in May 2009, which saw the deaths of tens of thousands of people and thousands more injured.
On Sunday, hundreds of Canadian Tamils remembered the tragic events of Black July in 1983 and last year’s alleged genocide against the Tamil people in Sri Lanka by the government security forces. The commemoration was held at Queen’s Park in front of the Ontario Legislature in downtown Toronto.
“In Sri Lanka even shedding a tear in the wrong place at the wrong time could lead to sharing the fate of the 12.000 Tamil political prisoners being held in military secret camps," stated Siva Vimal in an e-mail to Digital Journal. While the Tamils worldwide are united in mourning, it is in Sri Lanka that those who raised their voice for justice and freedom are being imprisoned and punished. Tamil Canadians are gathering in tens of thousands to Remember those 200,000 Tamils slaughtered in the last 27 years."
A glimpse of the hundreds of Tamils standing in silence.
A glimpse of the hundreds of Tamils standing in silence.
Hosts of Black July standing for a moment of silence.
Hosts of Black July standing for a moment of silence.
Tamil woman holding the flag of Tamil Eelam.
Tamil woman holding the flag of Tamil Eelam.
Kavitha Senathilmurugan  lighting a candle.
Kavitha Senathilmurugan, lighting a candle.
Hundreds of Tamils at the Black July commemoration.
Hundreds of Tamils at the Black July commemoration.
Kandiah Sivathasan  a concerned Tamil.
Kandiah Sivathasan, a concerned Tamil.
Kavitha Senathilmurugan  representative for National Council for Canadian Tamils.
Kavitha Senathilmurugan, representative for National Council for Canadian Tamils.
Elected member of TGTE.
Elected member of TGTE.
While the remembrance was focused on Black July, Transnational Government of Tamil Eelam elected representatives and National Council of Canadian Tamils members urged the international community to conduct a proper international independent investigation into the alleged war crimes and human rights violations committed by the Sri Lankan government, the boycott of Sri Lanka and international access of more than 12,000 prisoners of war.
The ceremony also provided a glimpse into Tamil culture with music and dance performances from a few groups. The host of the event noted that the music was to honour the Tamil tradition and the fallen, while the dance showed the strength, resilience and pride of the Tamils history and culture.
Kandiah Sivathasan, a concerned Tamil who goes to every rally, meeting and ceremony, asked Digital Journal why the international community continues to remain silent and make a conviction of whether or not they support the Tamils and their pursuit for justice.
Drummer of band playing at Tamil Black July commemoration.
Drummer of band playing at Tamil Black July commemoration.
Singer at Black July commemoration.
Singer at Black July commemoration.
Drummer of band playing at Tamil Black July commemoration.
Drummer of band playing at Tamil Black July commemoration.
“Why do the governments help the victims of Haiti? Because we needed to as human beings. Then why don’t they help the Tamils? We’re not asking for money, we’re asking for justice and peace because we’re a self-determined people.”
The ceremony concluded with a large candlelight vigil, which was similar to May’s remembrance event at Queen’s Park. The crowd stood for a moment of silence and let the candles burn. Men, women and children stood quietly with their candles in front of centre stage.
As the situation in Sri Lanka persists, organizers vowed that they will continue to inform, educate, mobilize and apply pressure on the Sri Lankan government so the Tamils can finally live in peace and those responsible for the actions in the country can be held accountable.
Former Sri Lankan and Canadian Member of Parliament M.K. Eelaventhan  an experienced man  holding a ...
Former Sri Lankan and Canadian Member of Parliament M.K. Eelaventhan, an experienced man, holding a candle during the vigil at Black July.
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