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article imageFacebook founder accused of calling first few users 'dumb'

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By Andrew Moran     May 14, 2010 in Business
Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg was completely perplexed in 2004 that the first few thousand users of the popular social networking website trusted him with their data. So much so that he allegedly called them "dumb f**cks."
Back in 2004, when Facebook was a small social networking website, founder Mark Zuckerberg suposedly called his first few thousand users “dumb f**cks” because they actually trusted him with their personal information, according to The Register.
A published instant messaging transcript, which has not been denied or has its authenticity been questioned by the company, shows that Zuckerberg was chatting with an unnamed friend in 2004 about the early days of Facebook.
The 19-year-old Zuckerberg said, “Yeah so if you ever need info about anyone at Harvard just ask. I have over 4,000 e-mails, pictures, addresses, SNS.” The unknown friend asked, “What? How’d you manage that?” Zuckerberg responded, “People just submitted it. I don’t know why. They “trust me.” Dumb f**cks.”
Metro reports that Facebook did, however, respond to the recently released transcript and assured users and the general public that the company is deeply concerned about the privacy and security of their users’ information, “We’re not going to debate claims from anonymous sources or dated allegations that attempt to characterize Mark’s and Facebook’s views towards privacy.”
Six years later, Facebook has become a $22 billion company, notes the Business Insider, and the company’s success solely depends on users trusting them to ensure their privacy and security is protected.
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