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article imageOp-Ed: UK election too close to call

By Jane Fazackarley     May 5, 2010 in Politics
Last week saw the last of three election debates. Broadcast on Central, Sky and the BBC, Conservative Leader David Cameron, Lib Dem leader Nick Clegg and the PM Gordon Brown stood alongside each other and told us why we should vote for them.
These debates have been dubbed 'Presidential style' by some of the media and the idea for them was first touted years ago but for some reason never happened. Personally, I would have loved to have seen Tony Blair take part in one.
The viewing figures have been impressive, maybe not by US standards, but nine million-plus viewers for any kind of political show in the UK is unheard of and up there with the likes of Britain's Got Talent.
Not everyone has been a fan them, having tired of the election always seeming to be in the news a while ago, but I think they are a good thing.
At a time when few people can be bothered about politics, politicians or even be bothered to vote the debates are well- timed and seem to have engaged younger people who are among the least likely to put their cross on the ballot box on May 6.
What's more, they have made this election a three horse race. The Liberal Democrats were pretty much dismissed from the start as they always are but the election debates have made a 'star' of Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrat leader that not too many could name a while ago.
For the first time that I can remember, the results of the election are hard to call. The one thing that does seem certain is that on May 7th there will no longer be a Labour government because despite performing far better in the TV debates than he does at the dispatch box, it hasn't made Gordon Brown any more popular in the polls.
The polls are indicating a Conservative government or a hung parliament come Friday morning and if it is a hung parliament or a balanced parliament, has some would prefer to call it, then these these TV debates will have played their part, splitting the vote in a way few thought possible a short time ago.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
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