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article imageEarly wild flowers mark spring in carolinian Ontario Special

By Betty Kowall     Apr 17, 2010 in Lifestyle
Guelph - Winters can be relentless and spring frustrating on the northern edge of the carolinian forest in south-central Ontario. All is forgiven when the wildflowers of spring begin to bloom.
In southern Ontario wild flowers fall into two general categories. Some wildflowers are indigenous, present from the last ice age. Others are foreign species that have adapted and naturalized. Together they provide a broad palette from the earliest days of spring into the fall.
To the left is a generous drift of Dicentra eximia, an early spring wildflower commonly known as bloodroot in southern Ontario. Five centuries ago bloodroot's quality as a red dye earned its reputation long before it became taxonomically known as sanguinaria canadensis.
Interestingly, bloodroot relies on ants to ensure procreation. According to Martin Galloway the seeds of bloodroot have a fleshy appendage that ants find irresistible and drag to their nests. They dine on only the fleshy appendage and in the process distribute and sow the seeds.
Wild Bleeding-Heart to the left of me and Violets to the right of me
Wild Bleeding-Heart to the left of me and Violets to the right of me,
Even dandelions might seem to march to the gardener s beat as the first signs of spring brighten the...
Even dandelions might seem to march to the gardener's beat as the first signs of spring brighten the garden.
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