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article imageHoward Dean: I will not vigorously support Obama re-election

By Oliver VanDervoort     Dec 17, 2009 in Politics
Upping his opposition to the health care legislation, Howard Dean has taken more swipes at President Obama, after White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs fired proverbial shots at the former Vermont Governor.
Dean, who championed the public option and then less outspokenly supported the Medicare buy-in, said Thursday on MSNBC's Morning Joe that he won't "vigorously" support Obama's re-election in 2012.
"I'm going to support President Obama when he runs for re-election," Dean said. "Not vigorously. I'm going to vote for him."
Yesterday, the White House spokesman Robert Gibbs had harsh words for Dean, who does not support the Health Care Reform legislation without either a Public Option, or the Medicare buy-in:
"I would ask Dr. Dean, how better do you address those who don't have insurance: passing a bill that will cover 30 million who don't currently have it or killing the bill?" he added. "I don't think any rational person would say killing the bill makes a whole lot of sense at this point."
Dean also wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post in which he slammed the legislation by saying: "Any measure that expands private insurers' monopoly over health care and transfers millions of taxpayer dollars to private corporations is not real health-care reform."
This latest attack from a political ally comes at the same time that Obama sees his job approval rating slip under 50 percent.
Obama defended what most progressives are calling a watered down health bill saying:
"Your premiums will go up," said the president, responding to those who oppose the bill. "Employers will load up costs to you, and they potentially will drop your coverage, and the federal government will go bankrupt, because Medicare and Medicaid are on a trajectory that are unsustainable."
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