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article imageTwitter Passes Digg in Traffic

By Jennifer V. Pointer     Jan 21, 2009 in Technology
Neither site has managed to turn a profit; both are relying on investors to keep growing their technologies, while they try to produce a profitable business model. Will Twitter’s success continue, and will Digg continue to flat line? Who will pay?
Twitter’s traffic for the first time this week surpassed that of Digg once thought by some to be the be-all, end-all of social news. HitWise Intelligence’s Heather Dougherty cites Twitter’s appeal to the age 25-34 demographic, its Twitter’s mobile-friendliness, and ability to interact with other social networks as reasons for Twitter’s success.
Twitter, unlike, Digg, also gives users the ability to post updates directly to the site, rather than requiring users to submit news articles from 3rd parties, placing the focus on the users themselves as citizen journalists or commentators rather than on their choice of news sources.
While Digg’s “bury” feature is used, and sometimes misused by ideological rivals to eliminate submissions that are unpopular with the majority of Digg users, Twitter has allowed a more organic form of “democracy,” dictate which stories gain the most attention, by allowing users to Tweet, follow and respond to stories that interest them, and simply ignore those that don’t.
Neither site has managed to turn a profit; both are relying on investors to keep growing their technologies, while they try to produce a profitable business model. The competition for traffic and users is fierce, especially with the downturned economy.
It is most likely a coincidence that during the days leading up to Twitter’s “catching up” with Digg, Twitter was hacked and hit with a major phishing scam. There is no evidence at this time to indicate that the attackers were acting on behalf of any of Twitter’s rivals for market share. However, as the competition becomes fiercer for certain demographics, it is possible that users of highly competitive sites could become “collateral damage,” in the dark side of the technology wars. Using common sense security strategies and keeping firewalls and anti-virus software updated is as important as ever.
Will Twitter’s success continue, and will Digg continue to flat line? Much of that will depend on the ever changing needs and interests of the users. The social networks which are highly adaptable to mobile technologies, increasingly interactive with other networks, and consistently focused on meeting the demands of their users have a much better advantage in this world of technology which is barreling toward Web 3.0.
More about Twitter, Digg, Social Networking, Mobile technology