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article imageOp-Ed: High Fructose Corn Syrup - Corn Producers Strike Back

By Bob Ewing     Sep 8, 2008 in Food
The video is one of two ads that I have viewed that turn the tables on the person challenging the consumption of high-fructose corn syrup.
The ad in the video is one of two that I have viewed that turn the tables on the person challenging the consumption of high-fructose corn syrup. Are the corn producers fighting back?
I do not find the ads all that effective but they do take a behaviour that some people may display, making a statement without any supporting evidence, and show people getting caught doing so. The moral for me is: get the facts before casting your comments.
The Mayo Clinic says high-fructose corn syrup is a sweetener and preservative used in many processed foods. It is made by changing the sugar in cornstarch to fructose — another form of sugar.
The preserving aspect of high-fructose corn syrup extends food’s shelf life and costs less than sugar. It is also sweeter.
High-fructose corn syrup is commonly found in soda and fruit-flavour drinks and other processed foods.
Is it responsible for obesity? Let’s get back to the Mayo Clinic.
One theory is that fructose is more readily converted to fat by your liver than is sucrose, increasing the levels of fat in your bloodstream. But this hasn't been proved.
Animal studies have shown a link between increased consumption of high-fructose corn syrup and adverse health effects, such as diabetes and high cholesterol. However, the evidence is not as clear in human studies.
To gain some idea of what is in your food read the labels. The Mayo Clinic offers the following tips:
• Buy 100 percent fruit juice instead of fruit-flavored drinks.
• Choose fresh fruit instead of fruit juices. Even 100 percent fruit juice has a high concentration of sugar.
• Choose fruit canned in its own juices instead of heavy syrup.
• Cut back on soda.
All good, but if you concerned about your overall sugar intake then eat fresh vegetables, meats, fish, and chicken as well.
It is dangerous to blame one substance or one form of a substance for obesity; if you are worried about your weight burn off more calories than you consume and when you eat, choose fresh or frozen over canned. Turn off the TV and take a walk.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
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