Email
Password
Remember meForgot password?
    Log in with Twitter

article imageOp-Ed: When passing bizarre laws becomes a trend

By Vinay Chand     Aug 19, 2008 in Politics
What length are city mayors willing to go to pass some of the oddest, most bizarre laws in a bid to enhance 'public decorum'? Read on!
Emboldened by a nationwide crackdown on crime and a government decree giving them extra law-and-order powers, Italian mayors have issued a string of often bizarre by-laws to enhance "public decorum."
The phenomenon goes all the way to find a place in newspapers around the world who have dubbed it as 'the summer of bans'. Matters became so bad that even a particular town hall had to admit things had gone too far.
Here are some of the strangest by-laws probably known to man, or at least our Italian counterparts! (No offence meant)
1. When in Capri, don't wander off the beach in a bikini.
2. Mowing your lawn not allowed on the weekend in Forte dei Marmi.
3. Building sandcastles on the beach is a crime at the sea in Eraclea, near Venice.
4. Feeding pigeons is off-limits in the centre of Lucca.
5. Public displays of affection in a car can earn you a fine of up to 500 euros ($745) in Eboli.
6. In Novara groups of more than two people are forbidden from lounging around in parks at night.
If you thought that was it, here's something more.
Reuters reported:
Rodrigo Piccoli, 33, called national radio to protest after he was fined 50 euros for lying down in a park in the northern city of Vicenza to read a book. The mayor has since promised to drop the ban.
Well, every country passes a few laws that just don't make sense. In fact, to be honest, India where I come from has a few of its own that may as well be more than a cause to burst out laughing for outsiders. However, this is about Italy where the rate at which these laws have been passed one after another in the same season all across the country is amusing if not just downright funny.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
More about Laws, Italy, Bizarre
More news from
Latest News
Top News