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article imageRon Paul and the Media: FOX-Snubbed, Holds Own Debate

By Eric S. Wyatt     Jan 8, 2008 in Politics
To the dismay of his enthusiastic and active supporters, Ron Paul was excluded from a recent debate. Paul's response was to hold a one-man forum; a response that is the latest episode in a campaign filled with unique characteristics and contradictions.
Ron Paul's solution to being snubbed by Fox News during the news outlet's final pre-New Hampshire Primary debate was to attempt to get his message out via a televised town-hall style forum. The candidate fielded questions from his campaign manager in front of a crowd estimated at one hundred.
Paul's exclusion from the final pre-Primary debate in New Hampshire underscores the dichotomy of the Paul campaign. On one hand, Paul has very dedicated, energetic, and "revolutionary" supporters and he has been able to raise a staggering amount of campaign contributions.
On the other hand, Paul's message hasn't resonated with Republican voters, gaining just under 10% of the vote in Iowa and not registering any votes in Wyoming's Republican Caucus, according to the results posted at The Politico. And his polling numbers for today's New Hampshire Primary indicate a similar 10%-level return is to be expected. Even worse for Paul's Presidential aspirations, his poll numbers in South Carolina (which many political insiders consider the "real" start of the GOP primary season) put him at only 4% of the vote.
One possible piece of this puzzle can be seen in the candidate activity maps displayed below. The maps are provided as part of election coverage of the New York Times, and comprise data for candidate activity between April, 2007 and yesterday.
The first map shows the campaign activity of Mitt Romney:
Mitt Romney s campaign activity based on data compiled by the New York Times.
Mitt Romney's campaign activity based on data compiled by the New York Times.
A look at Romney's activity shows the number of trips (represented by red dots, with larger dots being indicative of multiple trips to the same city) to the various early-voting states.
A similar map for surprise contender Mike Huckabee shows a similar level of activity:
Mike Huckabee s Campaign Activity based on data compiled by the New York Times.
Mike Huckabee's Campaign Activity based on data compiled by the New York Times.
But Ron Paul's map shows that the candidate has spent considerably less time "on the ground", relying on volunteers and the "viral" nature of his internet-based campaign to translate into votes:
Ron Paul s campaign activity based on data compiled by the New York Times.
Ron Paul's campaign activity based on data compiled by the New York Times.
(The maps above are difficult to see in detail in this format, but you can re-create the maps at the NYTimes website link above.)
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