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article imageOp-Ed: 5 overdue female artists for Country Music Hall of Fame induction

By Markos Papadatos     Jul 29, 2014 in Music
The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum has inducted many worthy female artists from Dolly Parton, Loretta Lynn to Reba McEntire, Jean Shepard and Emmylou Harris, but these five ladies are noticeably missing.
These five iconic women are arranged in alphabetical order.
Lynn Anderson: Lynn Anderson has been dubbed as "The Great Lady of Country Music," and rightfully so. She has had 11 songs reach the top of the country charts and is best known for her smash hit "Rose Garden," which went No. 1 on the country charts and No. 3 on Billboard's Hot 100 charts. It has sold 18 million copies and she was the best-selling female artist in the genre until Shania Twain came long. Lynn Anderson was the first female country singer to sell out New York's Madison Square Garden, win an American Music Award (AMA) in 1974, as well as the first to do the Tonight Show with Johnny Carson. She also has her own "rose" named in her honor and country music is in her genes. Her late mother, Liz Anderson, was one of the most prolific singer-songwriters in the genre's history.
Janie Fricke: Janie Fricke is best known as one of country music's 80s ladies. She was crowned "Female Vocalist of the Year" by the Country Music Association (CMA) in 1982 and 1983, and by the Academy of Country Music in 1983. Fricke has garnered three Grammy nominations and has recorded duets with such country greats as Merle Haggard, Larry Gatlin, Tommy Hunter and the late Charlie Rich. Eight of her classic hits have reached the top of the country charts.
Veteran country singer Janie Fricke
Veteran country singer Janie Fricke
Photo Courtesy of Webster PR
Crystal Gayle: Aside for being known as the sister of Loretta Lynn and for her extremely long hair, Crystal Gayle is a talented and accomplished singer in her own right. She won a Grammy award for her country-pop crossover hit "Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue" and she has secured 20 No. 1 singles on the country charts and six gold-certified albums. Her album We Must Believe in Magic was one of the first by a female artist to go platinum in country music. Gayle has been spotlighted by her own exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, entitled "Crystal Gayle: When I Dream." The exhibit consists of fashion, awards, letters, family photos and more from her impressive career in music. She also has her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
Country singer Crystal Gayle
Country singer Crystal Gayle
Gor Megaera, courtesy of Webster PR
Jan Howard: Jan Howard started her career as a demo vocalist, where she was the first person to ever record such classic country tunes as "Heartaches By The Number," "Pick Me Up On Your Way Down," "She's Got You" and "I Fall to Pieces." On March 27, 1971, she was made a member of the Grand Ole Opry. She garnered two Grammy nominations and "Evil On Your Mind" peaked at No. 5 on the Billboard Hot Country Airplay charts in 1966, which is ranked in the "Top 500 Country Music Greatest Singles of All-Time." Her duet with veteran country singer-songwriter Bill Anderson garnered three Country Music Association (CMA) nominations for "Vocal Duo of the Year" in 1968, 1970 and 1971. Their duet "For Loving You" spent four weeks at the top of the Billboard Country Airplay charts, becoming her most successful radio single. Howard has also been one of the most sought-after background vocalists. Her backing vocals can be heard on such Johnny Cash classics as "Ring of Fire," "Ghost Riders In The Sky," and she sang the classic line "Mama Sang Tenor" in Cash's "Daddy Sang Bass." A notable songwriter in her own right, Howard's songs have been recorded by such Country Music Hall of Famers as Tammy Wynette, Conway Twitty, Kitty Wells, Bill Anderson, Connie Smith and Johnny Cash. Jan has been dubbed "The Classiest Lady in Country Music."
Country star Jan Howard
Country star Jan Howard
Ron Harman
Jeannie Seely: Jeannie Seely is a beloved country music star and she has been a member of the Grand Ole Opry since 1967. She has been dubbed as "Miss Country Soul," and rightfully so. Her signature song, "Don't Touch Me," peaked at No. 2 on the Billboard Hot Country Songs charts, and it garnered her the 1967 Grammy award for "Best Female Country Vocal Performance," becoming the third woman in Grammy history to win that category. Seely has recorded numerous studio albums and collaborative projects. She has released over 30 singles, which have charted on the country charts. She still performs regularly on the historic Grand Ole Opry stage. Along with Country Music Hall of Famer Jean Shepard and fellow country star Jan Howard, they are known are the "Grand Ladies of the Grand Ole Opry." In addition, Seely has had songs recorded by eight Hall of Famers and she has had Grammy and CMA nominations as a duet team with country legend Jack Greene. She has sung backup with many other artists including Merle Haggard, Willie Nelson, Ernest Tubb and Hank Cochran. Most impressive about Seely is that she is the first female to host her own portion of the Opry on a regular basis.
Country singer and Grand Ole Opry star Jeannie Seely
Country singer and Grand Ole Opry star Jeannie Seely
Ron Harman
For all of these reasons and more, all of these five esteemed female musicians are deserving to be members of the prestigious Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum.
This opinion article was written by an independent writer. The opinions and views expressed herein are those of the author and are not necessarily intended to reflect those of DigitalJournal.com
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